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June 2010

Do you get social? A Peek into #EMC's Social Business Journey

And, more importantly, do you “get” social?  Jive does! Conversation  

A few weeks ago, on Friday, June 18th, I had the pleasure of being invited to present EMC’s Social Business Journey to a group of friendly folks at the last session of Jive Software’s Get Social Tour 2010. I’m saying 2010, because I sincerely hope there is a 2011, 2012, and every year thereafter! This was a great opportunity to meet and converse with folks at all stages in their social business journey, and I absolutely loved it!

For those that were not able to attend any of the Get Social sessions for a variety of reasons, I highly encourage you to join the Jive Community take a look at some of the stellar case studies presented along the journey and see if they might be helpful to you in yours.

The cliff notes on my presentation are in my deck, and hopefully will provide a good starting point for you. Please let me know if you find them helpful, what’s missing, or even what you’ve done in your journey differently that met your stakeholder needs. I always love hearing others’ stories about their social journeys so that I can learn and evolve our own journey.


EMC Case Study - Jive Get Social Tour

View more presentations from Jamie Pappas.

While I love sharing EMC’s story, I have to say that the true value of such events comes from the ability to converse with and learn from others who are at various points in their own journey to a social business. And I particularly love hearing what has worked and what has not, so that I can test that our in our waters.

There was definitely overlap among the persistent themes I mentioned about Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Boston that same week:

  • There is still a ton of interest in getting started in this space, which is great! People want to start community and collaborating efforts and are coming in droves to see what works best to get going.
  • A whole lot of companies have started their journey and are seeing positive results from enabling their employees to connect and collaborate with one another
  • There is a keen interest in learning what other companies are up to, what is working, what is not, and why.
  • The ROI question seems that it will never die, nor should it. But it’s also amazing to hear the stories of the level of push-back some folks have endured in their journey to get social. As I said before, my answer to the ever-challenging ROI question is it’s a mix of both qualitative and quantitative measures.  Separately, they don’t mean a thing, but together, you can highlight savings, efficiency, and the power of networking and collaboration, so that it’s no longer a question of whether or not it’s providing tangible business results.
  • In person conversation and collaboration is just as important as staying connected online. The buzz and conversation in the air the entire morning is the strongest testament to this reality that I can offer. People were excited to meet others going through the same things that they are and you could feel the excitement in the air! Bringing people together in person is still an essential part of learning, development and networking. I don’t believe that will fundamentally ever change.
  • Carrying on the conversation after the in-person get together is just as important – which is exactly why Jive is offering up a group for us all to continue the conversation!

 

In fact, I can’t emphasize this point enough. It’s a really, really tough job to drive forward any type of social business collaboration initiative within just about any organization. Staying in touch with those that have been on the same path for some time, and those that are just starting their journey will provide you with a network of invaluable resources and people to bounce ideas off of, learn from, and develop lasting friendships with.

Your network, both in real life and online, will be one of the most important tools in your arsenal of the journey you are about to embark upon

So, what are you waiting for? Go - Get Social now

And if you're a large company with over 10,000 employees, come get social with us at The 2.0 Adoption Council, too!

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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Taking Enterprise 2.0 to the Next Level. A Reflection on #E2Conf Boston

This past week, I had the pleasure of attending – for the third time in a row – Enterprise 2.0 Conference here in Boston, MA.  Some seriously amazing talent comes together each time the conference is held here in Boston, as well as on the west coast in sunny California. I’m truly honored to be a part of the conference, and have the ability to chat with such forward thinking people.

I love this conference for a multitude of reasons, but primarily it’s the face-to-face interactions and the real-life case studies and stories that get me excited every year. Why? First off, I love meeting the folks that I've chatted with all year long on various social networking sites, including my 2.0 Adoption Council colleagues, and it’s truly like getting together with a bunch of old friends, sharing stories, drinking beers and just generally talking about whatever’s on our minds.

Speaking of The 2.0 Adoption Council, here’s a fabulous photo of a bunch of us after dinner on Wednesday night, graciously borrowed from our fearless concierge, Susan Scrupski, who was also brave enough to host a workshop with a bunch of us presenting, as well as an entire conference track.  You can check out the presentations from the workshop we gave on SlideShare.

AC1 

 

Secondly, the ability to hear what other companies are doing, what’s working and what’s not, how they’re handling challenges like getting folks to their communities, dealing with critics, increasing engagement, tackling that ever-challenging ROI question, and a multitude of other topics, is priceless. Whether you’re just starting your journey, or well into it like we are at EMC, this conference has something for everyone. A huge kudos to Steve Wylie, Super Woman Paige Finkleman and the whole cast and Advisory Board for another great conference!

Some quick observations around persistent themes:

  • A lot of companies are seeing successful results by enabling their employees to connect and collaborate with one another in easier ways than they have previously been able to do
  • A lot of companies are still trying to figure this out, and are interested in getting started – I met a lot of newbies at the conference, and it’s really great to see that there is still passion and enthusiasm for enabling employees to do their jobs better, faster and smarter
  • There is quickly becoming a large group of us who are hungry for more information than just at the beginner level. We’ve been in this space for 4 years externally and 3 years internally at EMC, and I’m looking to take it to the next level. So are a lot of others.
  • Lots of folks still seeming largely stumped by the ROI question. My answer – it’s a mix of both qualitative and quantitative measures.  Separately, they don’t mean a thing, but together, you can highlight savings, efficiency, and the power of networking and collaboration, so that it’s no longer a question of whether or not it’s providing tangible business results.
  • There is clearly a need for conferences like Enterprise 2.0 to bring together the folks that are trying to make this stuff work in their organizations – both business and IT folks.

As I mentioned before, we’ve been doing this for a long time at EMC, longer than most, in fact, and I’ve been in the thick of it the whole way through.  Here are some things that would take the Enterprise 2.0 conference to the next level for me (I also shared this feedback with the crew at the wrap up Town Hall session on Thursday afternoon):

  • More practitioners and their case studies – I love the knowledge that the high caliber consultants bring to the table, but I also want and frankly need to hear from people sitting in the same seat I am. I think there is a healthy place for both consultants and practitioners, and I just want to ensure we don’t lose sight of that as we move towards the future.
  • I totally get the fact that vendors need to make money, and showcasing their products at a conference like Enterprise 2.0 is one way to do that. That said, I do not want to see vendor demos in the Keynotes portion without a bit of thought leadership thrown in the mix, as well. Tell about your product, but also tell me how it addresses my pain points, and the pain points of my people, my organization. Don’t just walk me through screens and show me clicks. I want to know that you understand me and can help me.
  • I’d like to see differentiation between levels of expertise (or put another way - your place in the journey) for the sessions – nothing to scientific, just a bit of differentiation with case studies at each level of companies considering or that have already implemented some type of offering to their employees:
  • 1.     Beginner – Thinking about Enterprise 2.0 tools, but haven’t implemented? Thinking about how to make the business case? Thinking about how to get started? Thinking about planning for staffing, metrics, community managers, roles and responsibilities, etc? Just implemented within the past 6 months and still getting things moving?

    2.     Intermediate – Implemented more than 6 months ago, but still working to move things forward in your organization? Interested in adoption ideas? Interested in dealing with critics and naysayers? Interested in identifying and tackling under-penetrated pockets within your organization?

    3.     Advanced – Implemented more than a year or two ago? Interested in sustaining the vibrancy, momentum, adoption and engagement in your community?

  • There was mention of including industry information for sessions, and I agree with this – it’s helpful to know what companies in different industries are doing, especially in highly regulated industries.
  • More time for Q&A in all sessions – I can’t tell you how many times a session went on with folks talking, talking, talking, and then someone looked up and “Oops. Looks like we’re out of time for questions.” That’s a real bummer, and frankly, quite a loss. After all, aren’t we there to learn from one another? I know I always have questions at these sessions, but there’s never enough time baked in for audience questions. I’d like to see sessions planned with half the time for the presenters/panel/whatever and half the time reserved for audience questions. And I'd really like to see speakers stick to this format.
  • Finally, I need to see a coming together of the internal E 2.0 worlds and the external social media worlds. As I said in the Town Hall, there are many people like me who have an identity crisis and are tasked with further both internal E 2.0 initiatives, as well as further external social media and community initiatives and awareness. I'd like to see those worlds beginning to come together, and I think we have enough folks focusing on both that it would be a worthwhile endeavor to include a social media track in coming years.  

Overall, a fantastic conference, and by far, one of my favorites every year. In fact, I’d say, even if you can’t afford the full pass – get the free Expo pass and come network with folks at the conference. You won’t be disappointed. I promise.

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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