Previous month:
August 2010
Next month:
December 2010

October 2010

Enter the #EMC xCP xCelerator Challenge #xcpContest & Win!

Xcpchallenge
Show off your xCP chops and share your creations to help the xCP community build powerful solutions more quickly. Enter a winning xCelerator and you can share in the $50,000 prize pool!

What is the xCP xCelerator Challenge?

The xCP xCelerator Challenge is a contest that invites EMC Documentum customers, partners, and employees to submit working xCelerators to the xCP xCelerator xChange, a library of xCelerators contributed by the xCP community. The entries will be judged by the community and a panel of experts, and winners will share a $50,000 prize pool.

What Is An xCelerator?

An xCelerator is one or more assets that can be used to accelerate the creation, adoption, and/or implementation of an xCP solution. An xCelerator is not necessarily a complete, running application; instead, it is intended to hasten application development by providing key pieces of functionality.

What Types of xCelerators are Eligible for the Challenge?

For this Challenge, we're looking for executable (working) sample applications or single-purpose xCelerator assets. See the Judging Criteria for a complete description of the contest categories.

Who Can Enter?

The Challenge is open to all Documentum customers, partners, and employees.

Submission Categories

Each submission must be in one of three categories:

  1. Sample Application: Needs to provide the foundation for an end to end case management or BPM solution, covering the full lifecycle from creation to completion. An example is the Grants Management sample application that is provided with the xCP product.
  2. xCelerator Asset: A standalone component that can be plugged into any xCP application. Examples that are included with xCP include the Advanced Search xCelerator and several Activity Template xCelerators.
  3. Employee Submission: The best xCelerator submitted by an EMC employee. Employees may submit either type of xCelerator, but only one prize will be awarded.

We're looking for submissions that are executable or deployable to a working xCP application. That means xCP Design Patterns are not eligible for this contest (although you're encouraged to contribute those as well to help raise your community status).

What are the Prizes?

One cash prize will be awarded in each of the following categories:

  • Best Sample Application: $20,000
  • Best xCelerator Asset: $10,000
  • Best Employee Entry: $10,000

Plus, each of the three winning teams will receive one conference pass plus expenses to participate in an expert panel at the next EMC World, May 2011 in Las Vegas (total of 3 passes).

An Added Bonus!

Network with others across the entire EMC Documentum Developer Network!!

Sounds Great! How Do I Enter?

See How, What, and When to Submit your xCelerator

Timelines

  • Contest opens October 26th 2010 at Momentum Lisbon
  • All entries due by midnight Pacific Time, December 31 2010
  • Community posting of finalists and voting starts mid-January 2011
  • Voting complete early February 2011
  • Winners announced early March 2011
  • Winners present on Expert Panel at Momentum at EMC World May 2011

 

So, come on! Get your game on!! We want to hear from you!!

----

Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

 

Share|


Reblog: @amcafee's Do's/Don'ts for Work Social Platforms

Just read an excellent post by Andy McAfee (no shock there) that I think everyone should read when it comes to your employer's social platforms.

My comments on Andy's post illustrate a couple of "adds" to the list, but I'll share them here, as well. Be sure to check out all the comments on Andy's original blog post - lots of other great ideas and suggestions!

Do: Add value, be relevant - what you're doing in your work's social platform should be of value to and be relevant for the community that's congregated there. One of our "asks" is "content in context" - don't post about your project/work/etc in the middle of a conversation that has nothing to do with it. If you can make a connection, great! If you can't, how in the world do you expect others to do so? As a sidebar, if you can relate your work to the company strategy, especially big campaigns, activities, initiatives, etc. that's a win (at least at EMC, it is) - it helps others see how you're integrated in at the company and perhaps how they can be too.

Don't: Don't make it look like you have nothing else to do other than participate in the community unless that's explicitly what you're paid to do. Make sure you jump in to relevant conversations, share information and best practices, comment on others' content and conversations - but do not feel compelled to jump into ever conversation, reply to every post and generally make folks wonder what it is you really do for your company.

----

Reblog:  Do's and Don'ts for Your Work's Social Platforms by Andrew McAfee 

 

Andrew_mcafee1-thumb-386x349

Do's and Don'ts for Your Work's Social Platforms

11:25 AM Tuesday September 28, 2010  | Comments (20)

Emergent social software platforms — the enabling technologies of the 2.0 Era — are being deployed by enterprises at a rapid rate. Companies as varied as Microsoft, Spigit, Salesforce, Jive, Socialtext, and IBM now all offer enterprise social offerings for customers.

This brings up an important question: what are Enterprise 2.0best practices for individuals? Should an employee use her company's social networking software just like she uses her Facebook account? Should she microblog the same way she uses Twitter?

I say no. Enterprise 2.0 is not Web 2.0; corporate technologies are different than personal ones, even if they look and feel the same. They're there to support the work of the organization, not to let individuals do and say whatever they want.

As I've argued for some time, though, there's no deep incompatibility between these two use cases. The autonomous and personalized actions and interactions of people, facilitated by technology, can be a great benefit to the enterprise, because this work creates new knowledge and fosters novel connections.

So here are some recommendations about how to use these tools to simultaneously advance your own work, make your existence and expertise better known throughout a digital community, and benefit the organization as a whole. I'll divide them into three categories: things to do (in other words, positive ways to use Enterprise 2.0 technologies), things not to do, and gray areas — use cases I'm not sure about.

Things To Do

  • Narrate your work. Talk both about work in progress (the projects you're in the middle of, how they're coming, what you're learning, and so on), and finished goods (the projects, reports, presentations, etc. you've executed). This lets others discover what you know and what you're good at. It also makes you easier to find, and so increases the chances you can be a helpful colleague to someone. Finally, it builds your personal reputation and 'brand.'
  • Point to others' work, and provide commentary on it. When you come across something noteworthy, point to it and discuss why you think it's important. Chances are others would like to know about it. And include a link to the original source; people love links.
  • Comment and discuss. Post comments to others' blogs, join the conversations taking place on forums, and keep the social media discussions lively. Doing so will let others hear your voice, and also make them more likely to participate themselves.
  • Ask and answer questions. Don't just broadcast what you know; also broadcast your ignorance from time to time. Let the crowd help you if you're stuck. Most people and organizations are very pleasantly surprised by the amount of altruism unlocked by Enterprise 2.0.
  • Vote, like, give kudos, etc. Lots of social software platforms these days have tools for voting or signaling that you like something. Use them; they help provide structure to the community as a whole and let people know where the good stuff and real experts are. They also make you more popular.
  • Talk about social stuff going on at the company. Give a recap of the softball game, talk about plans for the holiday party, show how close the group is to its fundraising goal, and so on. Organizations are social places, and I think it's a shortsighted shame when E2.0 platforms are all business, all the time. However, it's often a good idea to give non-work stuff its own dedicated place on the platform so that people can avoid it if they want to.

Things Not To Do

  • Be narcissistic. Don't talk about what you had for lunch or how you're peeved that one more of your flights got delayed. It's selfish clutter, and serves no larger purpose. We all have lunches and delayed flights.
  • Gossip. Why on Earth would you want to be publicly identified as a rumormonger?
  • Be unsubstantiated. Your unsupported, shoot-from-the-hip, fact-and-logic free arguments and opinions are really uninteresting and unhelpful. If you're not willing to do the homework necessary to back up your points, don't bother making them.
  • Mock others or launch personal attacks. I had a friend who walked out of his performance review and tweeted about his boss's bad cufflinks. I thought this was a deeply bad idea. So are flame wars and trolling. Debates and disagreements are vital components of E2.0 communities, but like Samuel Johnson said, "honesty is not greater where elegance is less."
  • Discuss sex, politics, or religion. My dad tells me that these were the three taboo topics in the officer's mess when he was in the Navy. They seem like good taboos to keep in place with E2.0; it's just too easy to upset people and start nasty, pointless fights on these subjects. Of course, this these taboos don't really apply if you work at Playboy Enterprises or Focus on the Family.

Gray Areas

  • Humor. We all like a good laugh, but we also all have different and deeply-held notions about the boundaries among funny, unfunny, and offensive. Sharing humor with colleagues you don't know well is a stroll through a minefield.
  • Self-praise. It's great to hear positive things about our own work, and the temptation to pass them on is strong. I've given in to this temptation, but afterward I've felt like I've blown my own horn a little too loud. So these days I'm trying not to retweet compliments.
  • Unsolicited opinions on topics far from your own work. The CIO of a large retail insurance company told me a little while back that he was tired of employees using his blog's comment section to offer their views on the company's latest advertising campaign. I feel his pain. At the same time, however, I think it's critical that people not feel constrained to use E2.0 platforms to only talk about the stuff in their job descriptions. Maybe one way forward here is to stress that people's contributions need to be substantiated, as discussed above.

What do you think of these recommendations? Am I on track, or way off? And how do you handle the gray areas? Leave a comment, please, and let me know.

----

Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

 

Share|


Mixed Feelings on The Social Network : A Movie Review

Courtesy of http://www.thesocialnetwork-movie.com/ My husband and I went to see "The Social Network" this past weekend. Admittedly, I had mixed feelings about the movie. When he mentioned that he wanted to see the movie, I wrinkled my nose and sighed an "Oh no....Really?" Turns out he was most interested in the movie more because of it's soundtrack by Trent Reznor than the "story of Facebook," although that was an interesting aspect, as well.  Admittedly, the Reznor angle got me a little more interested, as well (Nine Inch Nails is one of my favorites).

The good news is that the movie wasn't as bad as I was anticipating it would be - the story is a mildly interesting one, even if Mark Zuckerberg does call it fiction

It wasn't a horrible movie, but it didn't make me walk out of the theater thinking "I'm going to recommend that movie to everyone" either. The notion of it being a "picture of the year" candidate is laughable. It's certainly nowhere near that caliber of movie.

I like Facebook as much as the next person. Probably more if you consider the fact that I opt to use Facebook as a part of my job - in fact, I develop and execute the social media strategy, inclusive of Facebook, for EMC Corporation. But this is not a "picture of the year" candidate, folks. There is, frankly, nothing about this movie that screams picture of the year to me. I just don't get that notion. Not one bit. Are we "there" now -- where the fad of social media has everyone raving over a mediocre story? Really?

Putting aside the fact that we watched the process of website development for over 2 hours, and a bunch of teenagers teeter between loving and hating one another (not all that uncommon -- or interesting, either), and selfishly vying to be the "owner" of the next-big-thing -- what I did like about the movie was the wit in some of the characters and the moments when there was clever banter back and forth. Although the movie's "Mark" was a jerk in the opening scene, the banter back and forth with his girlfriend was amusing to follow. Do people really talk like that? 

There were also even some emotional moments along the journey. I teetered between thinking Mark was a two-faced jerk and feeling sorry for him for for essentially throwing all of his friends away in the effort of claiming credit or owning the idea and creation of Facebook, or so the story goes in the movie. It's just sad, all the way around to see how people can fall apart under pressure. 

So at the end of the day, I was entertained during some parts, bored or annoyed during others, and overall would say this wasn't a horrible movie, but wasn't great either. I'd say that the $22.4 million it brought in over the weekend agrees. 

 

----

Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



Share|


Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

Had an absolute blast catching up with Thomas Jones (aka @Niketown588) last week along with social media cohorts @LenDevanna and @ThomLytle. Check it out and let us all know what you think! 

----

Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

This weeks special guests are Jamie Pappas (@JamiePappas), Len Devanna (@LenDevanna) and Thom Lytle (@ThomLytle). Jamie is the author of Social Media & Enterprise 2.0 Musings. Len is the author of Confessions of an eBiz Junkie. All three are the maestros of social media integration at EMC. Tune in and listen to this special podcast as Jamie, Len and Thom give us insight into:
  • How EMC|ONE is the catalyst to blogging 
  • How social media ties into peoples sense of belonging
  • How to make social media a value add for you
  • Social Networking and Your Personal Brand
  • Jamie's role in social media adoption among women
  • EXCLUSIVE EMC World 2011 Bloggers Lounge Update
  • Similarity between Jamie's childhood and mine
  • Thom's new blog site
  • and much much more

You can subscribe/listen to Coffee With Thomas via iTunes.

Link to Podcast: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMCs Social Media Maestros

----


Join EMC in the Social Space!

EMC Blogs, Twitter, Facebook, & LinkedIn 

 

EMC Bloggers @EMCCorp EMC Pages EMC Corp Profile
  @EMCWorld   EMC Corp Group
  @EMC_Events   EMC World Group
  Other EMC Accounts   EMC Developer Group


EMC Videos, Photos, Podcasts, Presentations, & Bookmarks

 

EMC Corp
EMC Corp
EMC Corp
EMC Corp
EMC Point BB
EMC Software
EMC Software

 

Explore Our World of Communities



----

Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



Share|