best practices

#e2conf attendees - Get Ready to Rumpus with @cmtybc @thecr @moxiesoft

Headed to #e2conf? You want engagement? You want transparency? You want achievable ROI? You'll want to head to The Rumpus Room.


The Community BackChannel, The Community Roundtable and Moxie Software are thrilled to invite you to The Rumpus Room! A gathering of Community Managers, Enterprise 2.0 denizens, Social Business strategy wonks and friends!

Join us for a tantalizing evening of PowerPoint Karaoke, food and fun! Bring your presentation (or heckling) skills, an empty belly, and good spirits! 

Here's how PowerPoint Karaoke works. Presenters will sign up to present with no prior knowledge of the presentation material. They will rock their five minute presentations! The audience will select the winners! 

Presenters are in the running for limited infamy, negligible fortune and prizes!! A good time will be had by all! 

A night to remember is coming. Are you ready? 

Grab your tickets now!

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Business: www.pappasadvisors.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

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Why Facebook Timeline is Good for Brands & the Top 5 Things You Need to Know

Reposting my post originally shared on the AMP blog, with a couple of updates:

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CocacolatimelineAs you all know now, Facebook made the switch for all brand pages over to the new Facebook Timeline layout as of March 30th. While the jury is still out among some social media professionals as to whether or not this shift is beneficial to brands, I’m not having any trouble seeing the value this shift brings to the table for brands seeking real relationships with their consumers. This shift in functionality is one that finally, and for the first real time in the social media space, enables brands to tell their story, share their history, share the milestones that matter, and engage with consumers in an authentic conversation and relationship. Does it get any better than that? Isn't that exactly what brands have been claiming to strive for? Then why have so many of them just allowed ths witch to happen without doing a thing to prepare? 

Here are the top 5 things you’ll need to keep in mind as you work towards rebranding your page with the Timeline functionality – and you do need to work to make  your page shine in the new Timeline layout! Simply allowing the switch to happen is not enough and you’re NOT doing your brand any favors if you didn’t put any thought into making the switch!

  1. Choose a cover photo that represents your brand and your story, while being mindful of Facebook’s rules on what your cover photo may not contain:
    • Price or purchase information, such as “40% off” or “Download it at our website”
    • Contact information, such as web address, email, mailing address or other information intended for your Page’s About section
    • References to user interface elements, such as Like or Share, or any other Facebook site features
    • Calls to action, such as “Get it now” or “Tell your friends”
  2. Highlight the most important elements of your brand along the top. Tabs as we know them are morphing into a series of icons highlighted just below your cover image.
    • Photos are a static element in the new design, but you can change everything else, and the order in which they appear – be sure to make good use of the limited real estate. I’d recommend not keeping Likes as one of the 4 primary tabs at the top – don’t you have more to share with visitors than how many other visitors have liked the page?
    • You’ll also need to choose images to represent the elements that you want to highlight – make this a priority given it’s placement on your page, as it’s one of the first things visitors will see
    • You can also pin a post to the top of your page to highlight the most important content/conversation for your brand
  3. Additional tab changes mean some additional work to optimize the visitor experience:
    • Default landing tabs are no longer an option so choose  your posts wisely as these will now be the first thing a visitor will see when engaging with your brand
    • The width of tabs is also changing from 520 pixels wide to 810 pixels wide – this means you’ll likely need to rework most of the tabs you had on your page previously to make use of the expanded real estate, but until you do, they’ll center within the 810 pixel width
  4. Milestones and the brand story become the forefront of the experience. While pondering what to include, consider these elements as you tell the story of your brand:
    • What are our brand goals and objectives?
    • What matters to our target audience?
    • Are there large gaps that we can fill with notable elements, such as key hires, new products, awards, etc.?
  5. Direct, private messages to brands from users are possible for the first time, enabling more direct brand-to-consumer interaction than ever before. As you’re adjusting to this new functionality you’ll want to consider:
    • Your strategy for responding to customer inquiries publicly vs. privately including message categories and response times or SLAs to inquiries
    • Real-estate is now precious on your page, so take offline conversations offline via direct messages

For some examples of great brand uses of Timeline, check out:

  • Coca Cola – With the exception of the Likes being one of the four icons at the top, the Coca-Cola page is a great example of a brand-relevant layout making excellent use of the Timeline functionality.
  • Barack Obama – Whether you support Obama or not, one look at his Facebook Timeline demonstrates that his team knows what they’re doing when it comes to leveraging the new functionality. They’ve peppered his page with relevant facts and news throughout his life. They’re also using the cover photo to demonstrate compelling, relevant information to this year’s campaigns.
  • Tide (yes, as in the laundry detergent) – The team at Tide has done a great job of laying out relevant milestones in the product’s history, along with interesting facts and information the company has shared with consumers over the years. They’re using their cover photo for new product awareness – a no-brainer! Bonus points for not having Likes among their top icons!
  • Subway – Who knew sandwiches could be this interesting! The company has done a great job of filling in interesting facts about the products, organization, and corporate responsibility throughout the years. Bonus points for not having Likes among their top icons!
  • Burberry – The fashion house has done a fantastic job of replicating theHeritage section of their website into their Facebook Timeline. Not surprisingly, they’ve also mastered the art of visual appeal in the use of eye-catching images sprinkled throughout their timeline.

All in all, while the new Timeline functionality swap seems like a very drastic one, and in many ways it is, it’s also a chance for brands to finally tell their story. It’s an opportunity for brands to connect with their consumers in a compelling way highlighting what matters the most to the consumers who wish to know the personality behind the brand. For brands, Timeline offers an easy way to connect in a more human, more personal way.

What have been your experiences with Timeline for brands so far? Do you like it? What would you change if you could?

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

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The Community BackChannel – A Community for all Community Managers #CMTYBC

Cmtybc_logo_mix For anyone who’s ever managed a community – whether an internally-facing employee community or an externally-facing community available to customers, partners, developers, employees, and the media – you know what a challenging, rewarding, frustrating, and fulfilling experience it can be to bring people together!

Yes, a community is all these things! And every community manager knows that all too well! 

It can also be a bit of a lonely experience in that often a community manager is the only person tasked with managing the community as a part of their job, and it’s often not even their full time job. They are often serving not only as the host of the party, but the educator, help desk, evangelist, technical expert, and whatever else comes along that needs their assistance. They are, to put it mildly, expected to wear a number of hats at any given moment. Theirs is a unique skill set that is not often found, and they often must reach outside of the organization for support and resources.

Enter the Community BackChannel.

Cmtybc_matrix Four of us  - all community management professionals with years of experience - Claire Flanagan, Ted Hopton, Megan Murray and I – know this all too well and decided that a free community to bring community builders together made perfect sense.

Per our Mission, we are committed to advancing the art and practice of community building by gathering active and engaged people together in a vibrant, trusting, no-sales-zone community - where we can learn from each other and from the experience of participating in a model community of our own.

We exist to serve practitioners, people who are actively involved in building communities. The exchange of ideas and experiences, the surfacing of issues and problems and questions, the peer-to-peer support, and the development of professional relationships among practitioners creates the greatest value within our community.

In the spirit of community and collaboration, we have intentionally interwoven ourselves with other groups involved in community building to forge stronger relationships within the community management space. You’ll notice that many of our members are leaders in public conversations about communities.

Why we’re Different.

We feel very strongly about bringing together all people in support of community building, regardless of company size, budget commitment, or official role at the organization. While we feel very strongly about a trusting no-sales-zone environment, we see the value that our trusted colleagues who work in the consulting and vendor spaces can bring to the conversation and want you to have the ability to network and learn from them. We also feel very strongly that community managers at companies of all sizes face the same challenges and need the same level of support a network such as the Community BackChannel can provide.

Similar to Greg Lowe’s experience, I was also made to leave a number of communities I had joined and built up strong relationships within when I chose to leave EMC and join AMP Agency. Building up these relationships and then being removed from the communities is not a fun experience. Trust me. In a new role, it’s a bit like having the rug pulled out from under you. The good news is that I'm now friends with most of the people I met in the past 2 years through these communities, but there's still a disruption in the conversation, flow of information, and my network. Consistency in a network that ebbs and flows with me as I make changes in my life is critical for me. Consistency and dependability are key tenets of community. 

Join us!

The criteria is very simple, really. Members simply need to:

  • have demonstrated a committed interest in sharing ideas about community building
  • have a publicly-visible complete LinkedIn profile
  • agree to and adhere to the Community Back Channel Code of Conduct, including the no-sales-zone policy
  • be approved for membership by the Board after all current members have had the opportunity to review and comment upon the application.

We’re already 50 strong in just 2 weeks, and will no doubt benefit from your knowledge and expertise! So, what are you waiting for? Join us!

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas 

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Social Media Metrics: Are you measuring the right thing?

Photo Courtesy of: http://www.livingstonbuzz.com In all of the conversations I have in working with folks to create a meaningful and measurable social media strategy, I work thru a series of 5 basic questions to help them not only think thru what they want to do, but also think thru how they’ll know when they’ve achieved success. Amazingly, time and again, the one question that always stumps folks is the one around measurement.

(I’ll cover the first 4 in greater detail in a series of other posts, but wanted to share them here high-level now, as well.)

  1. What are you trying to accomplish?
  2. What topics are you prepared to talk about and who are the subject matter experts already talking about it?
  3. Who are you trying to talk to?
  4. Where are they currently talking?
  5. How will you measure success? 

How will you know you achieved your goals? What are your measures of a successful effort? What precedents have been set before, if any? How will you meet or exceed those?

Generally speaking, the first 3 questions are easier for most groups to answer. Although the answers may not be ideal in all cases, they’re at least prepared to discuss them and work thru them together. The metrics question, however, is the one that brings the most discussion and questions and debate and grief just about every single time.

A typical answer to that question goes something like this:

Me: How will you measure success? 

Them: Our success measures will be that we achieve XX followers or fans in the first 90 days. Our success measures will be that we tweet XX times or post on our wall XX times in the first 90 days.

Photo Courtesy of: http://bowlpickins.com Me: [INSERT LOUD “WRONG ANSWER” BUZZER SOUND HERE!]

Ok. Let's chat this thru. How are these metrics helpful to the goals you just identified? In my view, these are metrics that anyone can achieve and are, frankly, meaningless numbers when gathered alone.

Them: But what else can we even measure? 

Me: Well, there are lots of things you can measure. At the bare minimum, you need to focus on both audience and engagement numbers. Let me say it again – at the bare minimum, you need to focus on both audience and engagement numbers.

(I’ll get into all sorts of other useful measures in a later post.)

Me: While it may feel good to have 5,000 fans on Facebook or 10,000 followers on Twitter, what good is that to you (really) if those fans and followers never engage with you or your brand, never comment, never share the information with their networks by liking, commenting, retweeting, etc.? It’s not!

The sad reality is that you’re also not achieving your goals in any way, shape, or form. You’re not having a conversation, you’re not increasing awareness or share of voice, and you’re certainly not influencing anyone.

If they’re not engaging with you, they’re not really adding any substantial value to your brand, they’re not reciprocating any sort of information exchange or conversation – and you don’t even know if they like what they’re seeing, although I’d argue it’s a pretty safe bet that they don’t like what they’re seeing if they’re not engaging with you. This is the kiss of death because they’re going to tune you out sooner or later, if they haven’t already.

So, while fans and followers are a nice to have – they’re only part of the equation when it comes to measuring success in your social media efforts.

If you’re not measuring both – you’re measuring the wrong thing. And that means you’re delivering the wrong results.

Photo Courtesy of http://www.phillymarketinglabs.com


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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

 

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A little social media marketing helps EMC Break Records

EMC Breaks Records

Last week, in case you hadn’t heard, EMC launched a record 41 products. You can view the Record Breakers simulcast replay on EMC.com, if you’d like. But, I’m not here to talk to you too much about the product side of things – I’m no product expert although I think that there are some awesome new products out there from EMC. Instead, I’d like to talk to you about the social media side of things that went very well, and that I’m extremely proud of. It’s also a demonstration of how well things can go when you have the passion and drive to move them forward, budget or no budget.

How things came together

Pre-Event: January 3 – January 17

First off, we started out with a direct mailer of “broken record puzzles” to key folks around the industry. The feedback was positive on these, and the intent was twofold – 1) Invite them personally to the Record Breaking event on January 18th, and 2) Encourage them to tell others about it in the hopes that their networks would also be interested in the event and accompanying announcements – this is WOM (word of mouth) marketing at its best! (Photos courtesy of Michael Cote)

Photo Courtesy of Michael Cote: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cote/5327583777/in/photostream/   Photo Courtesy of Michael Cote: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cote/5327584807/in/photostream/   Photo Courtesy of Michael Cote: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cote/5328235196/in/photostream/   Photo Courtesy of Michael Cote: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cote/5328235628/in/photostream/

EMCCorp Facebook Challenge Close on the heels of the puzzle, we launched a nifty little Facebook game to drive awareness and encourage fans (yes, I still call them fans!) to break their own records! It’s still up there if you’d like to give it a whirl. Warning: It’s rather addictive!

At the same time, we launched a couple of viral videos on EMC’s YouTube channel, which have accumulated over 700,000 views between the two of them, and successfully drove registration to the EMC event.

All this time, we were also tweeting about the event using a common hashtag - #EMCBreaksRecords - to drive awareness, registration and buzz. We were sharing the videos, making folks aware of the game, and also tweeting world records that had been previously broken – asking them in the form of questions in the morning to gain responses, and giving the answer at the end of the day.

I should also mention a practice that has worked very well for us to keep EMC employees around the globe in the loop of our activities in the social space, as well as enable them to join in on the activities in a consistent and measurable fashion – “social media activation kits.” These kits contain a high level overview of the program at hand, as well as links to content and collateral (both traditional and social), tracking links, hashtags, suggested tweets/posts, social hubs and just about anything else you can imagine to participate in a truly organized social marketing campaign. These are hosted the internal employee community that I used to manage, EMC|ONE – now thoughtfully managed and curated by our own community manager extraordinaire, Michelle Lavoie. Michelle was kind enough to host a front and center widget on the home page to drive further awareness of the activation kit, as well as the overall social media plan for the launch.

In-Event: January 18

The tweeting continued around things that were going on during the simulcast – EMC actually arranged to break a couple of world records with the folks at Guinness during the event. I’ve shared the videos of each within this post – check them out.

 

#EMCBreaksRecords The tweeting during the event also resulted in EMC’s first ever trending topic on Twitter across the entire United States. Last may, we reached trending in Boston for EMC World 2010 – but this is the first U.S.-wide achievement – so you could say we set a record in social media, as well!

EMC Community Network Also, for the first time ever, we held a live Q&A session within our own EMC Community Network. Envisioned and championed by the folks on the ECN team – this was the company’s first ever live simultaneous Q&A session – so another record for us, in a matter of speaking!

Also, the day of launch, our super stellar EMC Blogroll of subject matter experts along with other industry folks produced over 40 blog posts released on the day of the launch, further generating buzz, awareness and affinity for the EMC brand.

So what does all of this mean?

Well, at the end of the day, it means that social media engagement played a critical role in generating awareness and buzz about EMC’s most important and most impactful launch!! Here are a few key statistics and milestones:

  • 1,000+ Broken Records Mailed out to key influencers >> generated buzz, awareness, brand affinity, and ultimately registrations for the event
  • EMC’s first Facebook game generated 80,000+ tab views and over 6,500 new fans of the EMC Facebook page >> generated buzz, awareness, brand affinity, event registration and increased our social audience and the potential realm of our future conversations with these enthusiasts
  • Thanks to our viral videos, EMC’s YouTube channel was ranked #55 in the Gurus Category on YouTube >> increased awareness, buzz, brand affinity, and free advertising
  • The #EMCBreaksRecords hashtag achieved trending status across the entire U.S. during the event on January 18th with over 1,500 tweets across multiple geographies around the world! >> increased awareness, buzz generation, brand affinity, and free advertising
  • The EMC Community Network attracted new users to the community with the live Q&A –in fact, 42% of the visitors that day were new users to the ECN! >> Increased awareness, affinity and exclusive access to the subject matter experts people wanted to talk to the most!
  • EMC bloggers, as well as other bloggers generated over 40 blog posts on the launch >> generating buzz, awareness, and access to the SMEs on the topics surrounding the launch, as well as the products announced.
  • All of this amounted to thousands of mentions in the social space – blogs, tweets, Facebook posts and shares, and industry articles amount to an uber-magnified awareness of EMC and the company’s offerings, messaging and plans for 2011. Heck, even our stock price reached one of the highest points in the past 10 years.

Up Next?

With all that activity and success, you might be wondering what’s next – how will we keep the momentum going?

RBTour1

The EMC Record Breaking Tour, of course! You’ll be able to follow the tour drivers around the world as they make stops, break records, and demo all the latest and greatest from EMC! You can follow the drivers on the Twitter account we set up for them, and keep an eye out for the Record Breaking Tour blog coming soon! There will also be Facebook components, and an invite to all EMC customers, partners, and enthusiasts to share their own record breaking moments!

I’m looking forward to seeing what this next chapter holds!

 

 

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

 

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Reblog: @amcafee's Do's/Don'ts for Work Social Platforms

Just read an excellent post by Andy McAfee (no shock there) that I think everyone should read when it comes to your employer's social platforms.

My comments on Andy's post illustrate a couple of "adds" to the list, but I'll share them here, as well. Be sure to check out all the comments on Andy's original blog post - lots of other great ideas and suggestions!

Do: Add value, be relevant - what you're doing in your work's social platform should be of value to and be relevant for the community that's congregated there. One of our "asks" is "content in context" - don't post about your project/work/etc in the middle of a conversation that has nothing to do with it. If you can make a connection, great! If you can't, how in the world do you expect others to do so? As a sidebar, if you can relate your work to the company strategy, especially big campaigns, activities, initiatives, etc. that's a win (at least at EMC, it is) - it helps others see how you're integrated in at the company and perhaps how they can be too.

Don't: Don't make it look like you have nothing else to do other than participate in the community unless that's explicitly what you're paid to do. Make sure you jump in to relevant conversations, share information and best practices, comment on others' content and conversations - but do not feel compelled to jump into ever conversation, reply to every post and generally make folks wonder what it is you really do for your company.

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Reblog:  Do's and Don'ts for Your Work's Social Platforms by Andrew McAfee 

 

Andrew_mcafee1-thumb-386x349

Do's and Don'ts for Your Work's Social Platforms

11:25 AM Tuesday September 28, 2010  | Comments (20)

Emergent social software platforms — the enabling technologies of the 2.0 Era — are being deployed by enterprises at a rapid rate. Companies as varied as Microsoft, Spigit, Salesforce, Jive, Socialtext, and IBM now all offer enterprise social offerings for customers.

This brings up an important question: what are Enterprise 2.0best practices for individuals? Should an employee use her company's social networking software just like she uses her Facebook account? Should she microblog the same way she uses Twitter?

I say no. Enterprise 2.0 is not Web 2.0; corporate technologies are different than personal ones, even if they look and feel the same. They're there to support the work of the organization, not to let individuals do and say whatever they want.

As I've argued for some time, though, there's no deep incompatibility between these two use cases. The autonomous and personalized actions and interactions of people, facilitated by technology, can be a great benefit to the enterprise, because this work creates new knowledge and fosters novel connections.

So here are some recommendations about how to use these tools to simultaneously advance your own work, make your existence and expertise better known throughout a digital community, and benefit the organization as a whole. I'll divide them into three categories: things to do (in other words, positive ways to use Enterprise 2.0 technologies), things not to do, and gray areas — use cases I'm not sure about.

Things To Do

  • Narrate your work. Talk both about work in progress (the projects you're in the middle of, how they're coming, what you're learning, and so on), and finished goods (the projects, reports, presentations, etc. you've executed). This lets others discover what you know and what you're good at. It also makes you easier to find, and so increases the chances you can be a helpful colleague to someone. Finally, it builds your personal reputation and 'brand.'
  • Point to others' work, and provide commentary on it. When you come across something noteworthy, point to it and discuss why you think it's important. Chances are others would like to know about it. And include a link to the original source; people love links.
  • Comment and discuss. Post comments to others' blogs, join the conversations taking place on forums, and keep the social media discussions lively. Doing so will let others hear your voice, and also make them more likely to participate themselves.
  • Ask and answer questions. Don't just broadcast what you know; also broadcast your ignorance from time to time. Let the crowd help you if you're stuck. Most people and organizations are very pleasantly surprised by the amount of altruism unlocked by Enterprise 2.0.
  • Vote, like, give kudos, etc. Lots of social software platforms these days have tools for voting or signaling that you like something. Use them; they help provide structure to the community as a whole and let people know where the good stuff and real experts are. They also make you more popular.
  • Talk about social stuff going on at the company. Give a recap of the softball game, talk about plans for the holiday party, show how close the group is to its fundraising goal, and so on. Organizations are social places, and I think it's a shortsighted shame when E2.0 platforms are all business, all the time. However, it's often a good idea to give non-work stuff its own dedicated place on the platform so that people can avoid it if they want to.

Things Not To Do

  • Be narcissistic. Don't talk about what you had for lunch or how you're peeved that one more of your flights got delayed. It's selfish clutter, and serves no larger purpose. We all have lunches and delayed flights.
  • Gossip. Why on Earth would you want to be publicly identified as a rumormonger?
  • Be unsubstantiated. Your unsupported, shoot-from-the-hip, fact-and-logic free arguments and opinions are really uninteresting and unhelpful. If you're not willing to do the homework necessary to back up your points, don't bother making them.
  • Mock others or launch personal attacks. I had a friend who walked out of his performance review and tweeted about his boss's bad cufflinks. I thought this was a deeply bad idea. So are flame wars and trolling. Debates and disagreements are vital components of E2.0 communities, but like Samuel Johnson said, "honesty is not greater where elegance is less."
  • Discuss sex, politics, or religion. My dad tells me that these were the three taboo topics in the officer's mess when he was in the Navy. They seem like good taboos to keep in place with E2.0; it's just too easy to upset people and start nasty, pointless fights on these subjects. Of course, this these taboos don't really apply if you work at Playboy Enterprises or Focus on the Family.

Gray Areas

  • Humor. We all like a good laugh, but we also all have different and deeply-held notions about the boundaries among funny, unfunny, and offensive. Sharing humor with colleagues you don't know well is a stroll through a minefield.
  • Self-praise. It's great to hear positive things about our own work, and the temptation to pass them on is strong. I've given in to this temptation, but afterward I've felt like I've blown my own horn a little too loud. So these days I'm trying not to retweet compliments.
  • Unsolicited opinions on topics far from your own work. The CIO of a large retail insurance company told me a little while back that he was tired of employees using his blog's comment section to offer their views on the company's latest advertising campaign. I feel his pain. At the same time, however, I think it's critical that people not feel constrained to use E2.0 platforms to only talk about the stuff in their job descriptions. Maybe one way forward here is to stress that people's contributions need to be substantiated, as discussed above.

What do you think of these recommendations? Am I on track, or way off? And how do you handle the gray areas? Leave a comment, please, and let me know.

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

 

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Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

Had an absolute blast catching up with Thomas Jones (aka @Niketown588) last week along with social media cohorts @LenDevanna and @ThomLytle. Check it out and let us all know what you think! 

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Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

This weeks special guests are Jamie Pappas (@JamiePappas), Len Devanna (@LenDevanna) and Thom Lytle (@ThomLytle). Jamie is the author of Social Media & Enterprise 2.0 Musings. Len is the author of Confessions of an eBiz Junkie. All three are the maestros of social media integration at EMC. Tune in and listen to this special podcast as Jamie, Len and Thom give us insight into:
  • How EMC|ONE is the catalyst to blogging 
  • How social media ties into peoples sense of belonging
  • How to make social media a value add for you
  • Social Networking and Your Personal Brand
  • Jamie's role in social media adoption among women
  • EXCLUSIVE EMC World 2011 Bloggers Lounge Update
  • Similarity between Jamie's childhood and mine
  • Thom's new blog site
  • and much much more

You can subscribe/listen to Coffee With Thomas via iTunes.

Link to Podcast: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMCs Social Media Maestros

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



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Do you get social? A Peek into #EMC's Social Business Journey

And, more importantly, do you “get” social?  Jive does! Conversation  

A few weeks ago, on Friday, June 18th, I had the pleasure of being invited to present EMC’s Social Business Journey to a group of friendly folks at the last session of Jive Software’s Get Social Tour 2010. I’m saying 2010, because I sincerely hope there is a 2011, 2012, and every year thereafter! This was a great opportunity to meet and converse with folks at all stages in their social business journey, and I absolutely loved it!

For those that were not able to attend any of the Get Social sessions for a variety of reasons, I highly encourage you to join the Jive Community take a look at some of the stellar case studies presented along the journey and see if they might be helpful to you in yours.

The cliff notes on my presentation are in my deck, and hopefully will provide a good starting point for you. Please let me know if you find them helpful, what’s missing, or even what you’ve done in your journey differently that met your stakeholder needs. I always love hearing others’ stories about their social journeys so that I can learn and evolve our own journey.


EMC Case Study - Jive Get Social Tour

View more presentations from Jamie Pappas.

While I love sharing EMC’s story, I have to say that the true value of such events comes from the ability to converse with and learn from others who are at various points in their own journey to a social business. And I particularly love hearing what has worked and what has not, so that I can test that our in our waters.

There was definitely overlap among the persistent themes I mentioned about Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Boston that same week:

  • There is still a ton of interest in getting started in this space, which is great! People want to start community and collaborating efforts and are coming in droves to see what works best to get going.
  • A whole lot of companies have started their journey and are seeing positive results from enabling their employees to connect and collaborate with one another
  • There is a keen interest in learning what other companies are up to, what is working, what is not, and why.
  • The ROI question seems that it will never die, nor should it. But it’s also amazing to hear the stories of the level of push-back some folks have endured in their journey to get social. As I said before, my answer to the ever-challenging ROI question is it’s a mix of both qualitative and quantitative measures.  Separately, they don’t mean a thing, but together, you can highlight savings, efficiency, and the power of networking and collaboration, so that it’s no longer a question of whether or not it’s providing tangible business results.
  • In person conversation and collaboration is just as important as staying connected online. The buzz and conversation in the air the entire morning is the strongest testament to this reality that I can offer. People were excited to meet others going through the same things that they are and you could feel the excitement in the air! Bringing people together in person is still an essential part of learning, development and networking. I don’t believe that will fundamentally ever change.
  • Carrying on the conversation after the in-person get together is just as important – which is exactly why Jive is offering up a group for us all to continue the conversation!

 

In fact, I can’t emphasize this point enough. It’s a really, really tough job to drive forward any type of social business collaboration initiative within just about any organization. Staying in touch with those that have been on the same path for some time, and those that are just starting their journey will provide you with a network of invaluable resources and people to bounce ideas off of, learn from, and develop lasting friendships with.

Your network, both in real life and online, will be one of the most important tools in your arsenal of the journey you are about to embark upon

So, what are you waiting for? Go - Get Social now

And if you're a large company with over 10,000 employees, come get social with us at The 2.0 Adoption Council, too!

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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Taking Enterprise 2.0 to the Next Level. A Reflection on #E2Conf Boston

This past week, I had the pleasure of attending – for the third time in a row – Enterprise 2.0 Conference here in Boston, MA.  Some seriously amazing talent comes together each time the conference is held here in Boston, as well as on the west coast in sunny California. I’m truly honored to be a part of the conference, and have the ability to chat with such forward thinking people.

I love this conference for a multitude of reasons, but primarily it’s the face-to-face interactions and the real-life case studies and stories that get me excited every year. Why? First off, I love meeting the folks that I've chatted with all year long on various social networking sites, including my 2.0 Adoption Council colleagues, and it’s truly like getting together with a bunch of old friends, sharing stories, drinking beers and just generally talking about whatever’s on our minds.

Speaking of The 2.0 Adoption Council, here’s a fabulous photo of a bunch of us after dinner on Wednesday night, graciously borrowed from our fearless concierge, Susan Scrupski, who was also brave enough to host a workshop with a bunch of us presenting, as well as an entire conference track.  You can check out the presentations from the workshop we gave on SlideShare.

AC1 

 

Secondly, the ability to hear what other companies are doing, what’s working and what’s not, how they’re handling challenges like getting folks to their communities, dealing with critics, increasing engagement, tackling that ever-challenging ROI question, and a multitude of other topics, is priceless. Whether you’re just starting your journey, or well into it like we are at EMC, this conference has something for everyone. A huge kudos to Steve Wylie, Super Woman Paige Finkleman and the whole cast and Advisory Board for another great conference!

Some quick observations around persistent themes:

  • A lot of companies are seeing successful results by enabling their employees to connect and collaborate with one another in easier ways than they have previously been able to do
  • A lot of companies are still trying to figure this out, and are interested in getting started – I met a lot of newbies at the conference, and it’s really great to see that there is still passion and enthusiasm for enabling employees to do their jobs better, faster and smarter
  • There is quickly becoming a large group of us who are hungry for more information than just at the beginner level. We’ve been in this space for 4 years externally and 3 years internally at EMC, and I’m looking to take it to the next level. So are a lot of others.
  • Lots of folks still seeming largely stumped by the ROI question. My answer – it’s a mix of both qualitative and quantitative measures.  Separately, they don’t mean a thing, but together, you can highlight savings, efficiency, and the power of networking and collaboration, so that it’s no longer a question of whether or not it’s providing tangible business results.
  • There is clearly a need for conferences like Enterprise 2.0 to bring together the folks that are trying to make this stuff work in their organizations – both business and IT folks.

As I mentioned before, we’ve been doing this for a long time at EMC, longer than most, in fact, and I’ve been in the thick of it the whole way through.  Here are some things that would take the Enterprise 2.0 conference to the next level for me (I also shared this feedback with the crew at the wrap up Town Hall session on Thursday afternoon):

  • More practitioners and their case studies – I love the knowledge that the high caliber consultants bring to the table, but I also want and frankly need to hear from people sitting in the same seat I am. I think there is a healthy place for both consultants and practitioners, and I just want to ensure we don’t lose sight of that as we move towards the future.
  • I totally get the fact that vendors need to make money, and showcasing their products at a conference like Enterprise 2.0 is one way to do that. That said, I do not want to see vendor demos in the Keynotes portion without a bit of thought leadership thrown in the mix, as well. Tell about your product, but also tell me how it addresses my pain points, and the pain points of my people, my organization. Don’t just walk me through screens and show me clicks. I want to know that you understand me and can help me.
  • I’d like to see differentiation between levels of expertise (or put another way - your place in the journey) for the sessions – nothing to scientific, just a bit of differentiation with case studies at each level of companies considering or that have already implemented some type of offering to their employees:
  • 1.     Beginner – Thinking about Enterprise 2.0 tools, but haven’t implemented? Thinking about how to make the business case? Thinking about how to get started? Thinking about planning for staffing, metrics, community managers, roles and responsibilities, etc? Just implemented within the past 6 months and still getting things moving?

    2.     Intermediate – Implemented more than 6 months ago, but still working to move things forward in your organization? Interested in adoption ideas? Interested in dealing with critics and naysayers? Interested in identifying and tackling under-penetrated pockets within your organization?

    3.     Advanced – Implemented more than a year or two ago? Interested in sustaining the vibrancy, momentum, adoption and engagement in your community?

  • There was mention of including industry information for sessions, and I agree with this – it’s helpful to know what companies in different industries are doing, especially in highly regulated industries.
  • More time for Q&A in all sessions – I can’t tell you how many times a session went on with folks talking, talking, talking, and then someone looked up and “Oops. Looks like we’re out of time for questions.” That’s a real bummer, and frankly, quite a loss. After all, aren’t we there to learn from one another? I know I always have questions at these sessions, but there’s never enough time baked in for audience questions. I’d like to see sessions planned with half the time for the presenters/panel/whatever and half the time reserved for audience questions. And I'd really like to see speakers stick to this format.
  • Finally, I need to see a coming together of the internal E 2.0 worlds and the external social media worlds. As I said in the Town Hall, there are many people like me who have an identity crisis and are tasked with further both internal E 2.0 initiatives, as well as further external social media and community initiatives and awareness. I'd like to see those worlds beginning to come together, and I think we have enough folks focusing on both that it would be a worthwhile endeavor to include a social media track in coming years.  

Overall, a fantastic conference, and by far, one of my favorites every year. In fact, I’d say, even if you can’t afford the full pass – get the free Expo pass and come network with folks at the conference. You won’t be disappointed. I promise.

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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General Adoption Techniques for Social Media and Community

Puzzle We’re having an interesting discussion on adoption techniques and how to get relatively anti-social people engaged in social media and communities in our EMC|ONE community, and I thought I’d share my thoughts and response here with you, as well.

What have you found that is helpful to getting folks on-board and engaged in using social media? Any tips or tricks that work well for you? Please share them!

Here are some things that consistently work for me in our communities in helping folks to put the pieces together:

  • Identify business goals and the tools that will meet them: Don’t over-saturate with tools. The more tools you introduce, the more uncomfortable it will be for people already being asked to go outside their comfort zone. Start small with a few tools and demonstrate how to use them and their value, and then add as more tools are requested.
  • Keep it simple, welcoming and easy-to-use: The worst thing a community can be is difficult to navigate, difficult to access, and difficult to use. And it's critical to remember that just because it might be easy for us to use, it certainly doesn't mean that it's going to be easy for everyone else to use. When building a community, keep it's audience in mind and look at things from their perspective. Better yet - ask them what's working and what's not and make changes accordingly.
  • Provide tools and resources that help people get started: Don't assume that people will know what to do with a community, how they should use it, what they can or can't do and even how to get started. Start at the very beginning and remember what it was like when you were starting out exploring social media. What would have been helpful to you? Chances are good it will be helpful to others.
  • Approach community as an experiment: Flexibility is key when starting or managing a community. Don't be rigid in your expectations of its members or use cases for the community. Ask the community what they want, learn from them, and change accordingly. And above all - make sure the community members know they are valued and that you listen to them.
  • Combine business and social discussions, albeit unevenly: Typically, at EMC, we strive for an 80/20 mix, recognizing that they fuel each other. Just as people "socialize" in in-person meetings before they get started, so too, is it reasonable to expect that they'd want to do so in their online community. That is the very reason we have social "places: on EMC|ONE and why all other successful communities have them, as well - people want a place they can go to "get away from it all" and just get to know one another, without having to "work" or filter out the work-related stuff.
  • Fear of participation is normal: You must address it. What is causing the fear? Is it a lack of knowledge about the tools? Is it a lack of confidence about subject matter expertise? Is it a fear of being "wrong" in front of others? You'll need to understand the underlying cause of the fear in order to address it. Just remember that it's normal and don't make the person feel out of place by questioning it in an inappropriate setting or way.
  • Let the community manage the community: At the end of the day, one of the greatest and most rewarding things you can do is listen to the community and act on their requests, their needs, their expectations. It will not only build a relationship of trust and understanding, but these things will keep the members coming back.
  • Don’t underestimate the need for training on these tools: Just because it's easy for us doesn't mean it's easy for others. Training should always, always be a part of any successful community. And different options for training - in-person, webex, lunch-n-learn, online, CBT, should be included to address all learning styles.
  • Seek out opportunities to present value: Perhaps one hesitation is a perceived lack of value in these tools. Collect use cases and highlight them to all members as examples of what the potential is. And remember, the use cases vary from person to person, so you're going to need a fairly robust library of them to reach the critical mass of your audience. Don't overpromise what the community can do, either. Be realistic when identifying and presenting the value proposition and make sure you can demonstrate it.
  • Set expectations/guidelines for use: Members want to know what they can do with the tool. Focus on the positive things they can do and achieve. Don't give them a list of all of the things they cannot do right out of the gate. Instead, take it case-by-case and address any items of concern as they come up, and then put them into your best practices. Trust people to do the right thing.
  • Model the behaviors you wish to see: One of the best ways to demonstrate to your members what they can do is by doing it yourself. Model the behaviors, use cases, actions that they can take and demonstrate in real life what they can do with the tool, how they can interact with others, and what they can accomplish. The proof is in the pudding, as they say.

 

Please share your thoughts or commentary on what I've shared, and also what has or hasn't worked for you? And, how have you dealt with that?

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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