Conferences

#e2conf attendees - Get Ready to Rumpus with @cmtybc @thecr @moxiesoft

Headed to #e2conf? You want engagement? You want transparency? You want achievable ROI? You'll want to head to The Rumpus Room.


The Community BackChannel, The Community Roundtable and Moxie Software are thrilled to invite you to The Rumpus Room! A gathering of Community Managers, Enterprise 2.0 denizens, Social Business strategy wonks and friends!

Join us for a tantalizing evening of PowerPoint Karaoke, food and fun! Bring your presentation (or heckling) skills, an empty belly, and good spirits! 

Here's how PowerPoint Karaoke works. Presenters will sign up to present with no prior knowledge of the presentation material. They will rock their five minute presentations! The audience will select the winners! 

Presenters are in the running for limited infamy, negligible fortune and prizes!! A good time will be had by all! 

A night to remember is coming. Are you ready? 

Grab your tickets now!

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Business: www.pappasadvisors.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

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Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

Had an absolute blast catching up with Thomas Jones (aka @Niketown588) last week along with social media cohorts @LenDevanna and @ThomLytle. Check it out and let us all know what you think! 

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Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

This weeks special guests are Jamie Pappas (@JamiePappas), Len Devanna (@LenDevanna) and Thom Lytle (@ThomLytle). Jamie is the author of Social Media & Enterprise 2.0 Musings. Len is the author of Confessions of an eBiz Junkie. All three are the maestros of social media integration at EMC. Tune in and listen to this special podcast as Jamie, Len and Thom give us insight into:
  • How EMC|ONE is the catalyst to blogging 
  • How social media ties into peoples sense of belonging
  • How to make social media a value add for you
  • Social Networking and Your Personal Brand
  • Jamie's role in social media adoption among women
  • EXCLUSIVE EMC World 2011 Bloggers Lounge Update
  • Similarity between Jamie's childhood and mine
  • Thom's new blog site
  • and much much more

You can subscribe/listen to Coffee With Thomas via iTunes.

Link to Podcast: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMCs Social Media Maestros

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



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Do you get social? A Peek into #EMC's Social Business Journey

And, more importantly, do you “get” social?  Jive does! Conversation  

A few weeks ago, on Friday, June 18th, I had the pleasure of being invited to present EMC’s Social Business Journey to a group of friendly folks at the last session of Jive Software’s Get Social Tour 2010. I’m saying 2010, because I sincerely hope there is a 2011, 2012, and every year thereafter! This was a great opportunity to meet and converse with folks at all stages in their social business journey, and I absolutely loved it!

For those that were not able to attend any of the Get Social sessions for a variety of reasons, I highly encourage you to join the Jive Community take a look at some of the stellar case studies presented along the journey and see if they might be helpful to you in yours.

The cliff notes on my presentation are in my deck, and hopefully will provide a good starting point for you. Please let me know if you find them helpful, what’s missing, or even what you’ve done in your journey differently that met your stakeholder needs. I always love hearing others’ stories about their social journeys so that I can learn and evolve our own journey.


EMC Case Study - Jive Get Social Tour

View more presentations from Jamie Pappas.

While I love sharing EMC’s story, I have to say that the true value of such events comes from the ability to converse with and learn from others who are at various points in their own journey to a social business. And I particularly love hearing what has worked and what has not, so that I can test that our in our waters.

There was definitely overlap among the persistent themes I mentioned about Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Boston that same week:

  • There is still a ton of interest in getting started in this space, which is great! People want to start community and collaborating efforts and are coming in droves to see what works best to get going.
  • A whole lot of companies have started their journey and are seeing positive results from enabling their employees to connect and collaborate with one another
  • There is a keen interest in learning what other companies are up to, what is working, what is not, and why.
  • The ROI question seems that it will never die, nor should it. But it’s also amazing to hear the stories of the level of push-back some folks have endured in their journey to get social. As I said before, my answer to the ever-challenging ROI question is it’s a mix of both qualitative and quantitative measures.  Separately, they don’t mean a thing, but together, you can highlight savings, efficiency, and the power of networking and collaboration, so that it’s no longer a question of whether or not it’s providing tangible business results.
  • In person conversation and collaboration is just as important as staying connected online. The buzz and conversation in the air the entire morning is the strongest testament to this reality that I can offer. People were excited to meet others going through the same things that they are and you could feel the excitement in the air! Bringing people together in person is still an essential part of learning, development and networking. I don’t believe that will fundamentally ever change.
  • Carrying on the conversation after the in-person get together is just as important – which is exactly why Jive is offering up a group for us all to continue the conversation!

 

In fact, I can’t emphasize this point enough. It’s a really, really tough job to drive forward any type of social business collaboration initiative within just about any organization. Staying in touch with those that have been on the same path for some time, and those that are just starting their journey will provide you with a network of invaluable resources and people to bounce ideas off of, learn from, and develop lasting friendships with.

Your network, both in real life and online, will be one of the most important tools in your arsenal of the journey you are about to embark upon

So, what are you waiting for? Go - Get Social now

And if you're a large company with over 10,000 employees, come get social with us at The 2.0 Adoption Council, too!

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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Taking Enterprise 2.0 to the Next Level. A Reflection on #E2Conf Boston

This past week, I had the pleasure of attending – for the third time in a row – Enterprise 2.0 Conference here in Boston, MA.  Some seriously amazing talent comes together each time the conference is held here in Boston, as well as on the west coast in sunny California. I’m truly honored to be a part of the conference, and have the ability to chat with such forward thinking people.

I love this conference for a multitude of reasons, but primarily it’s the face-to-face interactions and the real-life case studies and stories that get me excited every year. Why? First off, I love meeting the folks that I've chatted with all year long on various social networking sites, including my 2.0 Adoption Council colleagues, and it’s truly like getting together with a bunch of old friends, sharing stories, drinking beers and just generally talking about whatever’s on our minds.

Speaking of The 2.0 Adoption Council, here’s a fabulous photo of a bunch of us after dinner on Wednesday night, graciously borrowed from our fearless concierge, Susan Scrupski, who was also brave enough to host a workshop with a bunch of us presenting, as well as an entire conference track.  You can check out the presentations from the workshop we gave on SlideShare.

AC1 

 

Secondly, the ability to hear what other companies are doing, what’s working and what’s not, how they’re handling challenges like getting folks to their communities, dealing with critics, increasing engagement, tackling that ever-challenging ROI question, and a multitude of other topics, is priceless. Whether you’re just starting your journey, or well into it like we are at EMC, this conference has something for everyone. A huge kudos to Steve Wylie, Super Woman Paige Finkleman and the whole cast and Advisory Board for another great conference!

Some quick observations around persistent themes:

  • A lot of companies are seeing successful results by enabling their employees to connect and collaborate with one another in easier ways than they have previously been able to do
  • A lot of companies are still trying to figure this out, and are interested in getting started – I met a lot of newbies at the conference, and it’s really great to see that there is still passion and enthusiasm for enabling employees to do their jobs better, faster and smarter
  • There is quickly becoming a large group of us who are hungry for more information than just at the beginner level. We’ve been in this space for 4 years externally and 3 years internally at EMC, and I’m looking to take it to the next level. So are a lot of others.
  • Lots of folks still seeming largely stumped by the ROI question. My answer – it’s a mix of both qualitative and quantitative measures.  Separately, they don’t mean a thing, but together, you can highlight savings, efficiency, and the power of networking and collaboration, so that it’s no longer a question of whether or not it’s providing tangible business results.
  • There is clearly a need for conferences like Enterprise 2.0 to bring together the folks that are trying to make this stuff work in their organizations – both business and IT folks.

As I mentioned before, we’ve been doing this for a long time at EMC, longer than most, in fact, and I’ve been in the thick of it the whole way through.  Here are some things that would take the Enterprise 2.0 conference to the next level for me (I also shared this feedback with the crew at the wrap up Town Hall session on Thursday afternoon):

  • More practitioners and their case studies – I love the knowledge that the high caliber consultants bring to the table, but I also want and frankly need to hear from people sitting in the same seat I am. I think there is a healthy place for both consultants and practitioners, and I just want to ensure we don’t lose sight of that as we move towards the future.
  • I totally get the fact that vendors need to make money, and showcasing their products at a conference like Enterprise 2.0 is one way to do that. That said, I do not want to see vendor demos in the Keynotes portion without a bit of thought leadership thrown in the mix, as well. Tell about your product, but also tell me how it addresses my pain points, and the pain points of my people, my organization. Don’t just walk me through screens and show me clicks. I want to know that you understand me and can help me.
  • I’d like to see differentiation between levels of expertise (or put another way - your place in the journey) for the sessions – nothing to scientific, just a bit of differentiation with case studies at each level of companies considering or that have already implemented some type of offering to their employees:
  • 1.     Beginner – Thinking about Enterprise 2.0 tools, but haven’t implemented? Thinking about how to make the business case? Thinking about how to get started? Thinking about planning for staffing, metrics, community managers, roles and responsibilities, etc? Just implemented within the past 6 months and still getting things moving?

    2.     Intermediate – Implemented more than 6 months ago, but still working to move things forward in your organization? Interested in adoption ideas? Interested in dealing with critics and naysayers? Interested in identifying and tackling under-penetrated pockets within your organization?

    3.     Advanced – Implemented more than a year or two ago? Interested in sustaining the vibrancy, momentum, adoption and engagement in your community?

  • There was mention of including industry information for sessions, and I agree with this – it’s helpful to know what companies in different industries are doing, especially in highly regulated industries.
  • More time for Q&A in all sessions – I can’t tell you how many times a session went on with folks talking, talking, talking, and then someone looked up and “Oops. Looks like we’re out of time for questions.” That’s a real bummer, and frankly, quite a loss. After all, aren’t we there to learn from one another? I know I always have questions at these sessions, but there’s never enough time baked in for audience questions. I’d like to see sessions planned with half the time for the presenters/panel/whatever and half the time reserved for audience questions. And I'd really like to see speakers stick to this format.
  • Finally, I need to see a coming together of the internal E 2.0 worlds and the external social media worlds. As I said in the Town Hall, there are many people like me who have an identity crisis and are tasked with further both internal E 2.0 initiatives, as well as further external social media and community initiatives and awareness. I'd like to see those worlds beginning to come together, and I think we have enough folks focusing on both that it would be a worthwhile endeavor to include a social media track in coming years.  

Overall, a fantastic conference, and by far, one of my favorites every year. In fact, I’d say, even if you can’t afford the full pass – get the free Expo pass and come network with folks at the conference. You won’t be disappointed. I promise.

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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A look back at the Intranet Insider World Tour 2010

Communitelligence I had a great time a few weeks back now at the Intranet Insider World Tour 2010 in NYC presented by Communitelligence and hosted by the folks at Con Edison headquarters, right in the heart of Union Square. A group of hand-selected folks presented on their endeavors to introduce social intranets and social collaboration into their organizations, some farther along in the process, but all of us there to learn and share. It was a fantastic feeling to be among such kindred peers.

There were a lot of case studies, best practices, and general findings presented from the likes of companies such as Intel, Alcatel-Lucent, ESPN (owned by The Walt Disney Company), Intranet Benchmarking Forum, General Electric, Peppercom, Deloitte, and many others. And many, if not all, of the companies present faced the same challenges, successes, and questions as to what to tackle next to continue to meet the needs of their stakeholders who are, in many cases, ready to try out each new kind of tool that comes out before the organization can even get it fully implemented.

One thing is for certain – everyone at this conference was there to share and learn from one another. It was evident from all of the speakers that things in this area move at the speed of lightning in terms of new technology and their employees’ interest in the new tools and technologies. This also presents one of the major challenges that every organization faces is that if they don’t introduce the social collaboration tools as new things come to market – if the organization cannot get these tools deployed quickly to meet the needs of their employees and embrace the use of social collaboration tools, the employees will find ways to get to the tools they need to do their jobs more effectively and efficiently.

There really are two choices – the organization embraces the tools and incorporates them as a part of their standard toolset, or employees will embrace them outside of the organization. Not a good thing in the eyes of most organizations, which is why every organization at the conference had recognized the need to drive forward the use of social collaboration tools within the organization.

A few themes resonated with me during the conference that I wanted to share with you:

Checklistgr

  • Social collaborative tools are becoming more and more a requirement as a part of the suite of tools available to employees
  • The forward-looking companies that are able to successfully use social collaboration tools do so both behind the firewall as well as outside of the firewall
  • Companies must embrace a model of listening - both internally and externally - in order to have a full picture of the information and feedback about the organization
  • Companies must embrace both the positive and the negative sentiments that are shared, and develop a trusting relationship with their employees and stakeholders by responding to both positive and negative feedback
  • Employees and external stakeholders expect a bi-directional communications model with companies, and companies that do not embrace that (i.e. continue to broadcast, even on social channels) will find themselves at a disadvantage
  • Employees are more insistent than ever that they need to have an opportunity to contribute their own knowledge to the organization, as well as seek knowledge from the larger audience outside of their immediate work group or organization
  • Collaborative intranets do indeed increase employee satisfaction, productivity and the feeling of contributing to the organization, as well as a feeling of knowing more about the organization and the direction it’s headed
  • Listening to employees and identifying tools that meet their needs and use cases is critical to the successful implementation of these tools, as well as continued adoption and use
  • Employees will find a way to use collaborative tools to do their jobs, whether or not you incorporate them as a part of your suite of employee tools and arm them with the knowledge to use them successfully
  • Multimedia such as video, podcasts and photos are becoming increasingly desired types of content in the fast-paced work environments that we are all in
  • Mobility is key – employees are increasingly demanding that the information they used to consume in a static website experience be more mobile and accessible to them in their preferred format, at their preferred location and at a time that is convenient to them

Gone are the days of one-way pushed content where employees are strictly consumers of a corporate message, and here are the days where employees demand the ability to contribute to the organizational “memory” and history of the organization and its successes and failures.

All in all, I had a great time at the conference, and am looking forward to continuing the conversation with all the wonderful new folks I met!

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 Jamie 

 Blog: http://www.jamiepappas.com

 Twitter: http://twitter.com/jamiepappas

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On the topic of Crock-i-ness

Crock Well, there’s been a lot of buzz both before and since Enterprise 2.0 San Francisco in San Francisco on the question of whether or not Enterprise 2.0 is a crock. Put another way, can Enterprise 2.0 tools and technologies deliver tangible business benefits with tangible use cases in support of the tools?

Anyone that knows me knows by now that I believe the answer to this is Yes – Enterprise 2.0 can provide tangible business benefits supported with tangible use cases and I’m going to share a few with you here that we’ve realized since the creation of our enterprise community two years ago, which supports blogs, wikis, discussions and user profiles, to name a few things.

I will say right up front that we never identified success for our initiative as 100% user adoption. Not only do I feel that 100% adoption is unrealistic, but I also don’t believe that Enterprise 2.0 is for everyone. I think that a lot of people can realize benefits from using the tools available to them, but I do not believe that there’s any “one size fits all” tool for any organization. If that were the case, we wouldn’t still have people using interoffice mail, leaving post-its on our desks, leaving voicemails, sending emails, etc. We’d have everyone using only one way to communicate, and I don’t think I need to say that this view of the world is completely unrealistic.

I’ll say again what I said on the panel I participated on at Enterprise 2.0 – Enterprise 2.0 is not a cure-all or fix-all. It’s an enabler. Here are some examples of what it’s enabled at EMC in just two short years:

Collaboration Increased Collaboration

One of the many challenges that large, geographically dispersed organizations face is bringing employees together to collaborate. It’s not that employees don’t want to collaborate; it’s that they have no way of knowing who is working on similar projects or facing similar problems around the company or around the world unless we enable and encourage them to share them somewhere.

That’s exactly what we’ve done on EMC|ONE – provided a platform that enables global, searchable access to conversations and content so that employees can connect with others facing the same challenges and share what has worked, what hasn’t and brainstorm on what to try next. A memorable story that has been shared with me, and that I like to retell is the salesperson in Australia who connected with the salesperson in North America about a deal on a specific product, against a specific competitor and they shared how they went into the sales call, collaborated on things that worked or didn’t, and ultimately won the deal. So, if I knew the dollar amount of that deal, I could conceivable call those dollars ROI.

 

Corporate Memory Corporate Memory & Reduction in Redundant Requests

Content and conversations that occur via email or presentations stored on people’s hard drives is arguably essentially lost when that employee leaves or their computer get fried or stolen unless they’ve happened to share that content with others and/or done regular backups of their content – neither of which always happens in a predictable fashion.

EMC|ONE provides employees a venue to share their content and have their conversations and ultimately helps to preserve that conversation and the though process behind it, along with any content that was shared in the context of the conversation. It also makes it accessible to other employees in a searchable community of information for reference, collaboration and updates, as needed. EMC|ONE has also helped many employees reduce redundant requests for information as these employees share and document their information and FAQs in the community, they have a central location to point people to for consistently requested information, and reduce their own personal email and phone traffic and free up their time to work on other things.

 

Dali Clock Quicker Response Times

One of the biggest frustrations I hear from employees is that they have to wait on or even track down information they’re looking for, which wastes time, money and effort on a consistent basis. I’ve heard, (I think it was in Dion Hinchcliffe’s workshop at Enterprise 2.0) that the average employee spends an hour a day looking for information, searching through old files, emails, etc. and boy do I believe it.

A story that I consistently hear from our sales folks is how wonderful it is for them be able to search our competitive community on EMC|ONE and find real-time information and updates about competitors. They also love the ability to ask a question and have anyone in the company be able to answer it instead of just whoever is on a distribution list they send an email out to.

Following up on the example above, folks also are very happy to have access to a location that has FAQs to various questions they need answers to without having to wait to hear back via phone or email when time is of the essence. Depending on the person and amount of time they spend searching for information, this savings could be minimal to a fairly substantial amount.

 

Innovation Increased Innovation

For the past three years, EMC had held an annual innovation conference, and it has been planned during the past 2 years on EMC|ONE and then the summary, wrap up, photos, etc. are also shared on EMC|ONE. That in and of itself (using EMC|ONE as the coordination point) has not increased innovation, but what it has done is helped to increase worldwide awareness of the importance that EMC places on innovation and it has increased access to the information, ideas, and proposals that were submitted for the innovation conference by EMC employees.

In addition to the annual Innovation Conference, employees innovate on EMC|ONE every single day by coming up with creative new ways to address problems, challenges, and concerns on a wide variety of topics (products, customer support, solutions, internal issues, software challenges, you name it) they are facing. Not only that, they work with other employees that they would not have otherwise had an opportunity to work with had it not been for EMC|ONE.

 

Questions Customer Support

At EMC, customer service is of the utmost importance. Our internal employee support forums for solving customer issues are, as of this weekend, now hosted on EMC|ONE. But long before the official migration happened, there have been all sorts of examples of employees collaborating together to make customer service as good as it can be. They work together, similar to the example above with innovation, on a wide variety of topics that concern EMC customers and creatively come up with new ideas and solutions to a wide variety of issues. Have some of those efforts kept customers and/or gotten us new customers? Yes, they have, and that in and of itself is an immensely powerful ROI.

 

Smile Increased Employee Satisfaction

I’ve read varying articles on how much it costs to replace an employee that leaves the organization and it seems relatively consistent that it’s around 150% of the employee’s annual salary to resource, interview, hire, and train a replacement employee for someone who quits.

I can tell you without a doubt, that many, many of our employees have shared stories with us (that were not solicited) about how much more connected they feel to the company since EMC|ONE began two years ago. A few examples:

Start_quote_15I cannot think of a time during my 20 years at EMC when I felt more informed, involved, and confident in myself and the business before EMC|ONE. ~EMC|ONE UserEnd_quote_11

Start_quote_15No other corporate resource gives me more value than EMC|ONE. I feel connected with what is going on, I understand our direction, and I get great satisfaction from contributing to people and initiatives across the organization that before I didn’t even know existed. ~EMC|ONE UserEnd_quote_11

Start_quote_15There has been no single resource which has added as much value to me, my customer messaging, and my understanding of EMC as EMC|ONE. I am part of the silent majority, who rarely makes the time to post, but gains tremendous value from this fantastic glimpse into the breadth of EMC. ~EMC|ONE User End_quote_11

What I don’t want folks to think is that I think is that Enterprise 2.0 is a piece of cake, that it’s easy or that it will fix all of your problems. It’s not a piece of cake, it’s not easy, and it won’t fix all of your problems. What it will do is begin to connect employees to one another that have never had an opportunity to connect before and possibly never would have if it hadn’t been for our efforts. It takes a lot of hard work and effort to even begin an Enterprise 2.0 initiative, let alone sustain it and grow it and assist in continuing along the path to reach its full potential. We certainly didn’t do everything perfectly. Tell me who has and I’m happy to listen. I am proud that we are trying, and continue to try to enable employees to get more done with less, be more connected with one another and work, and find increased job satisfaction.

Do I think Enterprise 2.0 is a crock? Nope. But what do think is that companies that don’t take it seriously and start investing in researching what it can do for them might just find themselves at a significant competitive disadvantage in the very real and near future.

Crocodile To companies and individuals that ignore the potential that Enterprise 2.0 has to offer or call it a crock, I’d say – Be careful, that crock’s teeth are very sharp and it's liable to bite you when you least expect it.

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 Jamie 

 Blog: http://www.jamiepappas.com

 Twitter: http://twitter.com/jamiepappas


Enterprise 2.0 is still alive and well, thank you very much

Me & My Rockstar Pass I am just back from a week in San Francisco attending the Enterprise 2.0 Conference in San Fran as a featured speaker along with a whole host of other industry experts. Those of us that were on the keynote stage got “backstage passes” and felt a bit like rock stars walking around. Thanks to everyone who made it possible for me to attend a great conference!

For my part, I participated in a panel with five other members from the 2.0 Adoption Council entitled “Is Enterprise 2.0 a Crock?”  I’ll share more on the panel and the whole idea of E 2.0 “crock-i-ness” in general in another post, as I’d like to get my overall conference thoughts down here first as well as share some advice based on ongoing discussions I had with folks at the conference that I hope to be helpful to them, as well as anyone else trying to do this. 

PanelSmall Photo courtesy of @adunne's Flickr Photostream. Panel left to right: Greg Lowe, Megan Murray, Bryce Williams, me, Bruce Galinksy, and Claire Flanagan. (I took a few photos, too, at the conference, though not nearly as good as Alex's.)

I have to say that I enjoyed the conference and the city of San Francisco. The weather was exceptionally nice and the city is amazing, even though I only saw a very small portion of its loveliness due to being inside most of the time.  But nothing compared to the opportunity to meet not only my friends from the 2.0 Adoption Council - Susan Scrupski our Founder, Andy McAfee, Greg Lowe, Megan Murray, Bryce Williams, Bruce Galinksy, Claire Flanagan, Timo Elliott, Hamilton Pridgen, Bert Sandie, and Donna Lucas - in person, but also so many other folks so passionate about the topic of Enterprise 2.0. I am proud to be a member of the 2.0 Adoption Council, and a part of the Enterprise 2.0 conference, as both have done great things for me on many levels.

One thing that’s still very clear to me from the conference, and the folks that I talked to there, is that Enterprise 2.0 is alive and well in terms of both interest in “cracking the code” of rollout and implementation as well as interest in and a hunger for examples of companies that are doing it and doing it well. It’s refreshing to work for a company (EMC) that’s considered to be ahead of the curve in terms of strategy, deployment, and adoption of Enterprise 2.0 tools and behaviors behind the firewall. I know that we still have a lot of learning and work ahead of us, but it’s neat to hear what folks think of what we’ve done so far, and of course to know that I’ve been in the thick of it.

So, how does one go about thinking about and preparing to launch an Enterprise 2.0 initiative? Here’s my advice on questions you need to ask yourself and be able to answer before moving forward. I’ll be elaborating on these questions in future posts:

How do you pitch the idea and to whom?

Understanding the key stakeholders and influences that need to be involved in the initiative and decision-making will go a long way towards a successful rollout. My recommendation is to define your goals and try to include key stakeholders from as many cross-functional teams as makes sense for your organization. This will hopefully reduce the number of times you may have to go back and re-pitch and refine the plan.

How do you determine what tools to use?

Understanding your goals will lead you towards tools. My recommendation would be to start smaller and more concise to meet specific goals you’ve identified and add new functionality as your users request it - providing too many bells and whistles up front will likely turn users off.

How do you secure executive sponsorship and program funding?

Getting an executive sponsor for your initiative who “gets it” and can articulate the value of the tools you’re proposing, as well as actually use them, is going to be key to your initiative.  You’ll also want to be honest with your budgetary needs – nothing is free, not even if the software’s free – it’s still going to take someone’s time (and time is money, after all), to roll out the initiative. My recommendation is to start with a pilot or beta program to get folks interested in the offering and then scale up as needed as new users join.

How do you educate on the tools?

Educating on the tool(s) that you choose is going to be key for a successful initiative. Too often, we make assumptions about people’s level of knowledge on any particular tool or subject. My advice is that you’re going to need to prepare beginner, intermediate, and advanced training materials in multiple formats to have a truly successful educational program.

How do you roll it out to the company?

When it’s time for go-live, you’re going to need to determine how you’re going to roll it out and to whom – will it be the whole company or a sample group of folks? You’ll also want to consider any marketing and communications channels you’ll be able to take advantage of to increase awareness. My recommendation is to also have a plan in place with consistent messaging for your advocates and evangelists to take advantage of when they share the tools with others. This will help to keep the messaging consistent and avoid confusion as to what the tools are for.

How do you handle the naysayers, those that don't see the value or support the idea?

See my previous blog post on this one.

How do you measure the impact and success?

You will inevitably want to consider the measurements you will take into account to consider your initiative a success. There are lots of different measures that can be captured, and each organization is different. My recommendation is to gain insights from your key stakeholders as to what they might consider a measure of success and then propose a phase 1 list to folks for consideration. As the tools and their use evolves, so too can your measures of success.

In summary, the key ingredients for any Enterprise 2.0 initiative are:

  • Executive sponsorship
  • Funding
  • Defined goals/purpose
  • Defined “rules of engagement”
  • Partnerships are key (IT, HR, Legal, PR, Business Units, etc.)
  • Group of passionate folks
  • Patience
  • Perhaps a leap of faith

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 Jamie 

 Blog: http://www.jamiepappas.com

 Twitter: http://twitter.com/jamiepappas


Innovation, Passion and Social Media come together at EMC's Third Annual Innovation Conference

EMC Innovation Conference Yesterday I had the absolute pleasure of attending EMC’s Third Annual Innovation Conference at one of our facilities in Franklin, Mass organized by friend, fellow blogger and social media enthusiast, Stuart Miniman(who did an amazing job pulling everything together!!! Kudos Stu!). This was my first Innovation Conference and I have to say that I cannot wait for next year’s!

 

From the moment I arrived, people were abuzz with the excitement of being in the midst of so many talented individuals, as well as anxiously awaiting the news as to whose idea had won the both the Innovation Showcase awards, as well as the naming of this  year’s prestigious Distinguished Engineers and EMC Fellow. A big congrats to all of the folks who achieved these honors and won awards yesterday!!

 

EMC Innovation Conference Worldwide Locations It was truly a worldwide event with people from all over the world participating in idea submission (there were over 1,400 ideas submitted!) and the conference itself both on local levels and globally. It was also very neat to see how diverse the teams of submitters were – folks from all over the company were coming together to collaborate on innovative ideas to improve EMC products and services for our customers, as well as introduce new ideas into the mix for what could become new products one day. One of the neatest moments of the conference was when folks all over the world connected live to EMC Sr. VP and CTO Jeff Nick to hear the award winners announced. Another highlight of the conference was that I loved meeting so many folks that I've talked to over the years on EMC|ONE, Twitter, or any other online tool in person for a change! It felt like getting together with a bunch of old friends. How great!

 

I also had the pleasure of participating on a panel moderated by Rob Masson along with Distinguished Engineer Steve Todd, NAS Advanced Development Manager John Cardente, and Ionix Technologist in the CTO’s office Ronen Artzi around “How we innovate at our local centers across EMC.” We discussed such compelling questions as “Are there areas within EMC or technology in general, that you feel have the greatest potential for innovation, and why?” and “Why is innovation important?” We all agreed that innovation is a key element of any successful company looking to stay in the game. We also discussed ways in which innovation can be enabled by social media tools and how they can connect you to people that you would not have otherwise met, but share similar passions, interests, and can help you propel your innovative ideas forward. Social media is a good way to both meet new folks, as well as carry on the conversation after an event such as the EMC Innovation Conference. In fact, our internal community EMC|ONE is very much abuzz today with folks talking about the conference yesterday.

 

The passion, creativity and drive of all of the folks that submitted the over 1,400 ideas to be considered is so humbling and awe-inspiring for me. It’s hard to put into words what a feeling of pride there was in the room as we sat there together talking about what an innovative company EMC is, as well as how we continue to propel the notion of innovation forward and make it a 365 day event instead of a once a year gathering! More on that soon, I’m sure, but what an exciting opportunity we have before us! Overall a great time had by all! As I said, I can’t wait til next year!!

 

Posts by Fellow Bloggers (will be updated as more posts are published):

Len Devanna

Steve Todd

Polly Pearson

Dave Spencer

Irsan Widarto

Stuart Miniman

Kathrin Winkler


 

Multi-media from the conference:

A few photos from me @ the Franklin Event

Len Devanna @ the Santa Clara Event

Irsan Widarto @ the Rotterdam Event

Executives on Innovation at EMC

Sandra Ferraro & Vijay Bharadwaj


Captivated by the force that is Gravity Summit, Boston 2009

Gravity Summit This past Monday, I had the absolute pleasure of attending Gravity Summit at the Harvard Faculty Club in Cambridge, Massachusetts put on by social media wizards Beverly Macy (also teaches social media marketing at UCLA) and Rodney Rumford (also co-founder of TweetPhoto which I’m looking forward to checking out!) 

The line-up for the day included big name brands sharing their social media experiences, strategy and advice for using social media successfully.  And the folks in attendance literally came from all over the country to witness the event, which speaks of the level of information one can achieve when attending.

Me, Hammer and Carina Cristiano Leoni @ Gravity Summit, Harvard

Hammer

MC Hammer – Life-long entrepreneur, blogger, tweeter, rapper, and all around nice guy - need I say more?

Gary Vaynerchuk – Also a life-long entrepreneur, creator and host of the famous Wine Library TV, and newly published book author

Troy Kelley – EVP & Chief Digital Officer @ Arnold Worldwide

Andy Mitchell – VP of Digital & Development Marketing @ CNN

Todd Defren – Principal @ Shift Communications

Josh Levine – Rebel Industries

Scott Gulbransen – PR & Social Media @ Intuit

Wendy Harman – Social Media Manager @ American Red Cross

Christi Day – Social Media Maven @ Southwest Airlines

Mike Spataro – VP @ Visible Technologies

David Puner (aka Dunkin Dave) – Social Media Manager @ Dunkin Donuts

Ramon deLeon (aka The Pizza Guy to Know in Chicago) – COO @ Domino’s Pizza Chicago

Polly Pearson – VP of Employment Brand & Strategy @ EMC Corp

If you missed the live streaming of the event on CNN.com/live on Monday, you can view videos of some of the folks on my YouTube Channel (some also embedded below). Hard to pick a favorite…Of course, I know EMC’s story very well, since I live it every day and am proud to be a part of the force and strategy.

Rather than do a play-by-play of the day, I thought I’d summarize the key points by picking a few keywords to describe the ongoing message of the entire day at Gravity Summit. I’d have to say they are listen, learn, engage, and empower.

Listen

Listen to what people are saying about your brand, whether it’s your personal brand or your company brand. Listen. Listen to what is being said, take it in, and use it as an opportunity to learn. In the opening remarks with Beverly Macy and Rodney Rumford, it was said “even if you’re never going to use social media in your business, you need to know how to listen to what your customers are saying.” I couldn’t agree more.

Learn

Learn from what is being said by others. There is an unprecedented ability to gain insights into what people are saying about your brand like never before through all social media channels. It’s like having the ability to finally be the fly on the wall we’ve all wanted to be at some point. As Rodney Rumford said “use social media to solicit feedback and be ready for what you’re going to hear – the good, the bad, and the ugly.” Take it as an opportunity to learn how to be a better brand and educate. Negative comments are such a huge opportunity to learn and keep people engaged. And, as Polly Pearson said, if people are complaining, it’s a sign they still care.

Engage

Engage with people via social media. I’ve always said that people want to connect with people, not nameless, faceless brands. Troy Kelley shared “markets are reporting getting more engagement out of social media than any other traditional marketing tools,” so now is your chance to get out there, engage, and be the central voice for your brand. As Hammer said, “perception has trumped reality, and if you’re allowing somebody else to control the perception of your brand, you’re in trouble […] being at the center of the flow of information about you and your brand is the key to managing your brand.”

Empower

Empower others to not only find out about your brand via social media, but also empower your employees to use social media in a transparent way. I agree with Gary Vaynerchuk that “social media’s power and potential are massively underrated.” I love Todd Defren’s take on social media: “social media is not about public relations, it's about public relationships […] social media is not about creating something new every day, but leveraging what you already have in creative ways.” It’s all about empowering people to take advantage of the opportunities social media presents to them and using social media to enhance information and relationships as we know them.

The only constructive feedback I have is that it seems like people were jumping out of their seats to engage with the presenters a bit more, and at times things felt a bit rushed. So, perhaps having one or two fewer presenters with a touch more time for Q&A would be a good thing? Hard to say for sure, but I’d love to see a bit more interactivity in the summit. After all, social media is about having conversations and building relationships.

All in all, a fantastic summit! My first of many, I hope! Kudos to Beverly and Rodney for a fantastic showing and event!

A few vids I shot from the event. See more on my YouTube Channel

MC Hammer Keynote, Part 1


 



Gary Vaynerchuk Keynote, Part 1 

 


Polly Pearson, EMC Case Study, Part 1

   


Todd Defren, Shift Communications, Part 1 

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 Jamie 

 Blog: http://jamiepappas.typepad.com/ 

 Twitter: http://twitter.com/jamiepappas

 


Clever Marketing by @GariFusion during PCB4

MarketingGenius I was browsing through tweets tagged with the #pcb4 hashtag for this past weekend’s PodCamp 4 in Boston when I came across what I thought was a genius marketing campaign on Twitter for Brookline sushi restaurant Gari Japanese Fusion


These people have worked it out – they locate local events in the Boston area, pick up on the hashtag and then tweet specials and coupons to the attendees around dinner time. It’s absolute genius if you ask me. 

More restaurants looking to get into using Twitter should take their lead and try to catch the eye of event attendees by tweeting the specials to their event hashtag. 

Very cool marketing plan that seems to be working out well for them! Can’t wait to try their sushi! 

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 Jamie