EMC

A little social media marketing helps EMC Break Records

EMC Breaks Records

Last week, in case you hadn’t heard, EMC launched a record 41 products. You can view the Record Breakers simulcast replay on EMC.com, if you’d like. But, I’m not here to talk to you too much about the product side of things – I’m no product expert although I think that there are some awesome new products out there from EMC. Instead, I’d like to talk to you about the social media side of things that went very well, and that I’m extremely proud of. It’s also a demonstration of how well things can go when you have the passion and drive to move them forward, budget or no budget.

How things came together

Pre-Event: January 3 – January 17

First off, we started out with a direct mailer of “broken record puzzles” to key folks around the industry. The feedback was positive on these, and the intent was twofold – 1) Invite them personally to the Record Breaking event on January 18th, and 2) Encourage them to tell others about it in the hopes that their networks would also be interested in the event and accompanying announcements – this is WOM (word of mouth) marketing at its best! (Photos courtesy of Michael Cote)

Photo Courtesy of Michael Cote: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cote/5327583777/in/photostream/   Photo Courtesy of Michael Cote: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cote/5327584807/in/photostream/   Photo Courtesy of Michael Cote: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cote/5328235196/in/photostream/   Photo Courtesy of Michael Cote: http://www.flickr.com/photos/cote/5328235628/in/photostream/

EMCCorp Facebook Challenge Close on the heels of the puzzle, we launched a nifty little Facebook game to drive awareness and encourage fans (yes, I still call them fans!) to break their own records! It’s still up there if you’d like to give it a whirl. Warning: It’s rather addictive!

At the same time, we launched a couple of viral videos on EMC’s YouTube channel, which have accumulated over 700,000 views between the two of them, and successfully drove registration to the EMC event.

All this time, we were also tweeting about the event using a common hashtag - #EMCBreaksRecords - to drive awareness, registration and buzz. We were sharing the videos, making folks aware of the game, and also tweeting world records that had been previously broken – asking them in the form of questions in the morning to gain responses, and giving the answer at the end of the day.

I should also mention a practice that has worked very well for us to keep EMC employees around the globe in the loop of our activities in the social space, as well as enable them to join in on the activities in a consistent and measurable fashion – “social media activation kits.” These kits contain a high level overview of the program at hand, as well as links to content and collateral (both traditional and social), tracking links, hashtags, suggested tweets/posts, social hubs and just about anything else you can imagine to participate in a truly organized social marketing campaign. These are hosted the internal employee community that I used to manage, EMC|ONE – now thoughtfully managed and curated by our own community manager extraordinaire, Michelle Lavoie. Michelle was kind enough to host a front and center widget on the home page to drive further awareness of the activation kit, as well as the overall social media plan for the launch.

In-Event: January 18

The tweeting continued around things that were going on during the simulcast – EMC actually arranged to break a couple of world records with the folks at Guinness during the event. I’ve shared the videos of each within this post – check them out.

 

#EMCBreaksRecords The tweeting during the event also resulted in EMC’s first ever trending topic on Twitter across the entire United States. Last may, we reached trending in Boston for EMC World 2010 – but this is the first U.S.-wide achievement – so you could say we set a record in social media, as well!

EMC Community Network Also, for the first time ever, we held a live Q&A session within our own EMC Community Network. Envisioned and championed by the folks on the ECN team – this was the company’s first ever live simultaneous Q&A session – so another record for us, in a matter of speaking!

Also, the day of launch, our super stellar EMC Blogroll of subject matter experts along with other industry folks produced over 40 blog posts released on the day of the launch, further generating buzz, awareness and affinity for the EMC brand.

So what does all of this mean?

Well, at the end of the day, it means that social media engagement played a critical role in generating awareness and buzz about EMC’s most important and most impactful launch!! Here are a few key statistics and milestones:

  • 1,000+ Broken Records Mailed out to key influencers >> generated buzz, awareness, brand affinity, and ultimately registrations for the event
  • EMC’s first Facebook game generated 80,000+ tab views and over 6,500 new fans of the EMC Facebook page >> generated buzz, awareness, brand affinity, event registration and increased our social audience and the potential realm of our future conversations with these enthusiasts
  • Thanks to our viral videos, EMC’s YouTube channel was ranked #55 in the Gurus Category on YouTube >> increased awareness, buzz, brand affinity, and free advertising
  • The #EMCBreaksRecords hashtag achieved trending status across the entire U.S. during the event on January 18th with over 1,500 tweets across multiple geographies around the world! >> increased awareness, buzz generation, brand affinity, and free advertising
  • The EMC Community Network attracted new users to the community with the live Q&A –in fact, 42% of the visitors that day were new users to the ECN! >> Increased awareness, affinity and exclusive access to the subject matter experts people wanted to talk to the most!
  • EMC bloggers, as well as other bloggers generated over 40 blog posts on the launch >> generating buzz, awareness, and access to the SMEs on the topics surrounding the launch, as well as the products announced.
  • All of this amounted to thousands of mentions in the social space – blogs, tweets, Facebook posts and shares, and industry articles amount to an uber-magnified awareness of EMC and the company’s offerings, messaging and plans for 2011. Heck, even our stock price reached one of the highest points in the past 10 years.

Up Next?

With all that activity and success, you might be wondering what’s next – how will we keep the momentum going?

RBTour1

The EMC Record Breaking Tour, of course! You’ll be able to follow the tour drivers around the world as they make stops, break records, and demo all the latest and greatest from EMC! You can follow the drivers on the Twitter account we set up for them, and keep an eye out for the Record Breaking Tour blog coming soon! There will also be Facebook components, and an invite to all EMC customers, partners, and enthusiasts to share their own record breaking moments!

I’m looking forward to seeing what this next chapter holds!

 

 

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

 

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My Social Media Christmas Wishlist

In the spirit of the holiday season, and in the spirit of reflection on the past year, I thought I'd compile my social media wish list for 2011. These things will not only make my job easier, I think they'll improve the overall impact of social media. 


Facebookglobe Analytics! Analytics! Analytics! It's still more painful that it ought to be at this point to both gather analytics from social media and community sites, and to integrate them into existing BI systems. I would love the ability to more easily not only gather analytics in an intelligible format from the sites we use for business - Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn, Flickr, EMC Community Network - but also the ability to more easily track how these sites are driving traffic, leads or even increasing SEO. Right now, Facebook is way ahead of the pack with their analytics, in my opinion, but it's still very difficult to tie any of our activity on Facebook back to our internal systems for more analysis. 


Anyone have any good suggestions on how to do this? What are you doing now for analytics? Is it still manual, or have you been able to automate to some extent?


Deliciousglobe A Social Media Budget! While we've taken major strides in becoming a part of corporate communications at EMC, we still have to beg, borrow, and steal to do any sort of compelling social activity - a cool video, an infographic, data visualizations, playbooks, etc. You name it, and I want it because we have a business need. Unfortunately, lots of folks still have the notion that "this social stuff is free" -- you and I both know it's not, so I'm looking forward to the day when social gets a line item in the budget for specialized marketing programs, and I'm looking forward to the day when I have a budget to do things better, faster, smarter, and in a way that makes them exponentially bigger and more compelling for those "everyday activities," as well.


Twitterglobe A one-size-fits-all monitoring tool! It still troubles me that we have to have many different monitoring stations set up to catch all the stuff going on in the social space, all the mentions of our brand, all those conversations we're interested in keeping up with and participating in. There are tools that are good for snapshots over a period of time - we use them. There are tools that are good for real time monitoring - we use them. There are tools that are good for seeing trends over time - we use them. There are tools for analytics and numbers - we use them. There are tools for tracking sentiment - we use them. Why can't I find a tool that does all of this for me? Sigh. I'll keep wishing on this one. And I'm almost inclined to move it to number 1!!


Diggglobe A way to keep track of all my social activity, or the activity of those I want to follow - all in one place. For those of us that have way too many social accounts, it's hard to keep track of folks, and who's where, and what they're doing, and what they're not doing, and...I could go on and on. Point here is that there's no easy way for me to just check in to see what's going on in the social world and see if I want to jump in. I have to login to my different accounts, check on my friends and network, nearly independently in each of them - even after all this time. Why, oh why, hasn't there been more done to integrate the primary tools together to give people the option of a social snapshot? 


Flickrglobe Friend Synchronicity. Following closely on the idea above - I want a button that finds all my friends, on any social network that I belong to, and enables me to connect with them on all of them at once, if I so choose. It's so hard when folks are are multiple networks and don't even use the same user name on them all - to find the people I want to stay connected with, where I want to stay connected. Where's my magic button to find them and connect to them in all of those places? 

 

Rssglobe More folks dedicated to social media strategy in their org or geo - full-time. Over three years into the "official" social journey and I still see folks only doing social media strategy part-time in their roles, and only because they've expressed an interest in doing so and have risen to the occasion. If we're ever going to be in a position to truly execute a synchronized social media strategy, I need a virtual army of full-time folks living within the business units and geos to help take things to the next level. We need to get folks out of the mindset that social media strategy is a "nice to have" and elevate it to the integrated and critical status deserving of serious marketing and communications efforts. And we need a team of folks who are able to focus on doing so!


Stumbleglobe Social Spamming Policing. I wish there were more attention paid to all the spammers on Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, pick your tool. Where do those notices go when I flag someone's content as spam? It seems they float around in cyberspace, and never actually prevent the person from doing the same thing a bazillion more times. This request is probably a never-ending battle, but seriously - there's gotta be something that can be done to stop the bikini babes on Twitter from harrassing me with "get a million followers in a day" ads or the faceless stalkers on Facebook from posting the latest "get rich quick" schemes onto my Facebook pages. 


Youtubeglobe Less emphasis on consultants and more emphasis on practitioners. Anyone who knows me knows this is a hot button. I am routinely shocked and disappointed that so much emphasis is placed on people who consult in social media and community, but have never actually managed a community, served as a community manager, driven adoption within an organization, or made a post to a company account in their lives. I wish, very much, that we start seeing more balance in this world in that we elevate the practitioners - the folks that have actually done all of the above and then some - to the same level that we seem to worship the folks that talk the talk, but don't walk the walk. It's nothing personal - really. I just sincerely hope that we get to a place where we value practitioners as much, if not  more, than folks who've never done the stuff. 

 

Technoratiglobe4 More collaboration. Every week we have new accounts cropping up - Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, LinkedIn, Flickr, you name it. While I love the passion and enthusiasm of the folks that decide to take that leap and get engaged in social media, I am a firm believer that less is more in the social space. Too many accounts are confusing and frustrating to our stakeholders. Fewer accounts makes it easier to stay engaged with us, know when it really is us, and keep up with the latest and greatest. My hope is that in 2011, we see more teams collaborating on accounts together than wishing to own a little slice of the digital universe and continuing to spin up new accounts. 


How about you? What would be on your social media wishlist? 

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

 

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Enter the #EMC xCP xCelerator Challenge #xcpContest & Win!

Xcpchallenge
Show off your xCP chops and share your creations to help the xCP community build powerful solutions more quickly. Enter a winning xCelerator and you can share in the $50,000 prize pool!

What is the xCP xCelerator Challenge?

The xCP xCelerator Challenge is a contest that invites EMC Documentum customers, partners, and employees to submit working xCelerators to the xCP xCelerator xChange, a library of xCelerators contributed by the xCP community. The entries will be judged by the community and a panel of experts, and winners will share a $50,000 prize pool.

What Is An xCelerator?

An xCelerator is one or more assets that can be used to accelerate the creation, adoption, and/or implementation of an xCP solution. An xCelerator is not necessarily a complete, running application; instead, it is intended to hasten application development by providing key pieces of functionality.

What Types of xCelerators are Eligible for the Challenge?

For this Challenge, we're looking for executable (working) sample applications or single-purpose xCelerator assets. See the Judging Criteria for a complete description of the contest categories.

Who Can Enter?

The Challenge is open to all Documentum customers, partners, and employees.

Submission Categories

Each submission must be in one of three categories:

  1. Sample Application: Needs to provide the foundation for an end to end case management or BPM solution, covering the full lifecycle from creation to completion. An example is the Grants Management sample application that is provided with the xCP product.
  2. xCelerator Asset: A standalone component that can be plugged into any xCP application. Examples that are included with xCP include the Advanced Search xCelerator and several Activity Template xCelerators.
  3. Employee Submission: The best xCelerator submitted by an EMC employee. Employees may submit either type of xCelerator, but only one prize will be awarded.

We're looking for submissions that are executable or deployable to a working xCP application. That means xCP Design Patterns are not eligible for this contest (although you're encouraged to contribute those as well to help raise your community status).

What are the Prizes?

One cash prize will be awarded in each of the following categories:

  • Best Sample Application: $20,000
  • Best xCelerator Asset: $10,000
  • Best Employee Entry: $10,000

Plus, each of the three winning teams will receive one conference pass plus expenses to participate in an expert panel at the next EMC World, May 2011 in Las Vegas (total of 3 passes).

An Added Bonus!

Network with others across the entire EMC Documentum Developer Network!!

Sounds Great! How Do I Enter?

See How, What, and When to Submit your xCelerator

Timelines

  • Contest opens October 26th 2010 at Momentum Lisbon
  • All entries due by midnight Pacific Time, December 31 2010
  • Community posting of finalists and voting starts mid-January 2011
  • Voting complete early February 2011
  • Winners announced early March 2011
  • Winners present on Expert Panel at Momentum at EMC World May 2011

 

So, come on! Get your game on!! We want to hear from you!!

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

 

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Mixed Feelings on The Social Network : A Movie Review

Courtesy of http://www.thesocialnetwork-movie.com/ My husband and I went to see "The Social Network" this past weekend. Admittedly, I had mixed feelings about the movie. When he mentioned that he wanted to see the movie, I wrinkled my nose and sighed an "Oh no....Really?" Turns out he was most interested in the movie more because of it's soundtrack by Trent Reznor than the "story of Facebook," although that was an interesting aspect, as well.  Admittedly, the Reznor angle got me a little more interested, as well (Nine Inch Nails is one of my favorites).

The good news is that the movie wasn't as bad as I was anticipating it would be - the story is a mildly interesting one, even if Mark Zuckerberg does call it fiction

It wasn't a horrible movie, but it didn't make me walk out of the theater thinking "I'm going to recommend that movie to everyone" either. The notion of it being a "picture of the year" candidate is laughable. It's certainly nowhere near that caliber of movie.

I like Facebook as much as the next person. Probably more if you consider the fact that I opt to use Facebook as a part of my job - in fact, I develop and execute the social media strategy, inclusive of Facebook, for EMC Corporation. But this is not a "picture of the year" candidate, folks. There is, frankly, nothing about this movie that screams picture of the year to me. I just don't get that notion. Not one bit. Are we "there" now -- where the fad of social media has everyone raving over a mediocre story? Really?

Putting aside the fact that we watched the process of website development for over 2 hours, and a bunch of teenagers teeter between loving and hating one another (not all that uncommon -- or interesting, either), and selfishly vying to be the "owner" of the next-big-thing -- what I did like about the movie was the wit in some of the characters and the moments when there was clever banter back and forth. Although the movie's "Mark" was a jerk in the opening scene, the banter back and forth with his girlfriend was amusing to follow. Do people really talk like that? 

There were also even some emotional moments along the journey. I teetered between thinking Mark was a two-faced jerk and feeling sorry for him for for essentially throwing all of his friends away in the effort of claiming credit or owning the idea and creation of Facebook, or so the story goes in the movie. It's just sad, all the way around to see how people can fall apart under pressure. 

So at the end of the day, I was entertained during some parts, bored or annoyed during others, and overall would say this wasn't a horrible movie, but wasn't great either. I'd say that the $22.4 million it brought in over the weekend agrees. 

 

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



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Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

Had an absolute blast catching up with Thomas Jones (aka @Niketown588) last week along with social media cohorts @LenDevanna and @ThomLytle. Check it out and let us all know what you think! 

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Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

This weeks special guests are Jamie Pappas (@JamiePappas), Len Devanna (@LenDevanna) and Thom Lytle (@ThomLytle). Jamie is the author of Social Media & Enterprise 2.0 Musings. Len is the author of Confessions of an eBiz Junkie. All three are the maestros of social media integration at EMC. Tune in and listen to this special podcast as Jamie, Len and Thom give us insight into:
  • How EMC|ONE is the catalyst to blogging 
  • How social media ties into peoples sense of belonging
  • How to make social media a value add for you
  • Social Networking and Your Personal Brand
  • Jamie's role in social media adoption among women
  • EXCLUSIVE EMC World 2011 Bloggers Lounge Update
  • Similarity between Jamie's childhood and mine
  • Thom's new blog site
  • and much much more

You can subscribe/listen to Coffee With Thomas via iTunes.

Link to Podcast: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMCs Social Media Maestros

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Join EMC in the Social Space!

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Explore Our World of Communities



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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



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Another EMC Community Job Opportunity Coming Your Way!

Opportunity's Knocking We're looking to add a few key team members to our family over here at EMC!  Take a look and see if you're interested! Please submit your resume through our resume system and feel free to let me know you did so, so that we can be on the lookout for it.

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Re-posted from Len Devanna's Blog


 

With Social Media becoming an increasingly important part of how we engage online, we're looking for some top talent to come join the team. Specifically, we're looking for a senior community manager type to help shape the future of EMC's community offerings.

If you have a strong passion for the social web, thrive in a highly collaborative team environment, and want to help build the future of digital communications, you may want to give this opportunity a close look. We're looking for someone who has successfully conceptualized, deployed and managed large and thriving B2B communities.

Sound interesting? Check this and other EMC opportunities out at the careers section of EMC.com. Candidates interested in this particular opportunity should search and submit your credentials against Req ID 59488BR.

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



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EMC Guarantee Goes Viral!

In case you haven't noticed, EMC's been pumping out viral videos for our EMC 20% Unified Storage Guarantee. There's something for everyone. Check them out!

The latest is this classic: The Prince of Dataness


And in case you missed the other two:

EMC's own Bill Scannell takes on Pro Billy Andrade

These rock stars made it to #6 on the AdAge Charts!

CHiPs Erik Estrada makes a return just for EMC!

This pro made it to #6 on the AdAge Charts and #2 on YouTube in Science & Technology! 

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas


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Opportunity's a knocking here at EMC - Check out EMC's Open Community Roles

Opportunity's KnockingWe're looking to add a few key team members to our family over here at EMC! Check them out and see if you're interested!

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Community Development Manager

 

Responsible for helping to build  EMC Community Network on-line community engagement strategy working closely with business unit marketing, product and technical teams to build an effective community footprint across public and private domains.  The position is based in Hopkinton, MA. A few of the fun things this team member does:

  • Provides consulting, training and support for community managers with the following direction and support
  • Maintains and constantly improves ECN Inside and Admin Corner, internal community resources that support large scale community on-boarding and growth.
  • Responsible for driving the value and growth of EMC’s Expert program; a member reputation reward initiative that identifies and promotes highly active community members. 
  • Drives content on EMC Community Network that promotes member discovery and engagement with appropriate communities 
  • Creates new self-serve tools and training modules to improve community manager competency    
  • Drives monthly community manager summits that encourage best practice sharing and problem solving 
  • Creates blogs, videos, tweets and other content that can be used across social media properties to drive awareness of  EMC communities

Sound like a great fit or want to learn more or how to apply? Check out the full job description here.
 

 


Online Community Manager, Information Intelligence Group (formerly Content Management & Archiving)

 

 EMC provides online communities for developers, customers, and partners who use EMC Documentum and Information Governance products and technologies. These communities contain a number of expanding resources including technical articles, code samples, discussion groups, and free Developer Editions of select products. Due to extraordinary growth in the amount of content and the number of members, EMC requires a full-time Community Manager to steer the communities towards the next level of member engagement. The position is based in Pleasanton, CA.

 

The Community Manager will foster community involvement and encourage conversation about the technologies, applications, and solutions provided by EMC’s Information Intelligence Group. These communities bring together Documentum customers, employees, and partners in an online environment, and encourage open feedback and participation across all groups.  This position will work closely with the Social Media manager.


This is a hands-on role for someone to have a real and visible impact on the quality of EMC’s relationship with its partners and customers alike. Here are a few of the fun things you'll get to do in this role: 

  •  Lead the day-to-day operations of the hosted community in conjunction with internal community owners. 
  •  Establish metrics to track progress against community objectives. 
  • Map out a plan for improving the structure of the IIG communities that will increase participation, content visibility, and member satisfaction, as well as ensuring that the community provides a resource for researching the benefits and capabilities of Documentum products.
  • Develop member recognition and reward programs that will encourage participation and recognize valued contributors.
  • Develop training materials and guides to assist members with finding, navigating, and creating content 
  • Assist with loading and promoting of sponsored content created for the community by various product and support teams, including product marketing, product management, support, engineering, education, and consulting.

 

 

Sound like a great fit or want to learn more or how to apply? Check out the full job description here.

Let me know if you have any questions or don't hear back on either of these positions and I'll gladly make sure  your info gets to the hiring manager!

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



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Do you get social? A Peek into #EMC's Social Business Journey

And, more importantly, do you “get” social?  Jive does! Conversation  

A few weeks ago, on Friday, June 18th, I had the pleasure of being invited to present EMC’s Social Business Journey to a group of friendly folks at the last session of Jive Software’s Get Social Tour 2010. I’m saying 2010, because I sincerely hope there is a 2011, 2012, and every year thereafter! This was a great opportunity to meet and converse with folks at all stages in their social business journey, and I absolutely loved it!

For those that were not able to attend any of the Get Social sessions for a variety of reasons, I highly encourage you to join the Jive Community take a look at some of the stellar case studies presented along the journey and see if they might be helpful to you in yours.

The cliff notes on my presentation are in my deck, and hopefully will provide a good starting point for you. Please let me know if you find them helpful, what’s missing, or even what you’ve done in your journey differently that met your stakeholder needs. I always love hearing others’ stories about their social journeys so that I can learn and evolve our own journey.


EMC Case Study - Jive Get Social Tour

View more presentations from Jamie Pappas.

While I love sharing EMC’s story, I have to say that the true value of such events comes from the ability to converse with and learn from others who are at various points in their own journey to a social business. And I particularly love hearing what has worked and what has not, so that I can test that our in our waters.

There was definitely overlap among the persistent themes I mentioned about Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Boston that same week:

  • There is still a ton of interest in getting started in this space, which is great! People want to start community and collaborating efforts and are coming in droves to see what works best to get going.
  • A whole lot of companies have started their journey and are seeing positive results from enabling their employees to connect and collaborate with one another
  • There is a keen interest in learning what other companies are up to, what is working, what is not, and why.
  • The ROI question seems that it will never die, nor should it. But it’s also amazing to hear the stories of the level of push-back some folks have endured in their journey to get social. As I said before, my answer to the ever-challenging ROI question is it’s a mix of both qualitative and quantitative measures.  Separately, they don’t mean a thing, but together, you can highlight savings, efficiency, and the power of networking and collaboration, so that it’s no longer a question of whether or not it’s providing tangible business results.
  • In person conversation and collaboration is just as important as staying connected online. The buzz and conversation in the air the entire morning is the strongest testament to this reality that I can offer. People were excited to meet others going through the same things that they are and you could feel the excitement in the air! Bringing people together in person is still an essential part of learning, development and networking. I don’t believe that will fundamentally ever change.
  • Carrying on the conversation after the in-person get together is just as important – which is exactly why Jive is offering up a group for us all to continue the conversation!

 

In fact, I can’t emphasize this point enough. It’s a really, really tough job to drive forward any type of social business collaboration initiative within just about any organization. Staying in touch with those that have been on the same path for some time, and those that are just starting their journey will provide you with a network of invaluable resources and people to bounce ideas off of, learn from, and develop lasting friendships with.

Your network, both in real life and online, will be one of the most important tools in your arsenal of the journey you are about to embark upon

So, what are you waiting for? Go - Get Social now

And if you're a large company with over 10,000 employees, come get social with us at The 2.0 Adoption Council, too!

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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Taking Enterprise 2.0 to the Next Level. A Reflection on #E2Conf Boston

This past week, I had the pleasure of attending – for the third time in a row – Enterprise 2.0 Conference here in Boston, MA.  Some seriously amazing talent comes together each time the conference is held here in Boston, as well as on the west coast in sunny California. I’m truly honored to be a part of the conference, and have the ability to chat with such forward thinking people.

I love this conference for a multitude of reasons, but primarily it’s the face-to-face interactions and the real-life case studies and stories that get me excited every year. Why? First off, I love meeting the folks that I've chatted with all year long on various social networking sites, including my 2.0 Adoption Council colleagues, and it’s truly like getting together with a bunch of old friends, sharing stories, drinking beers and just generally talking about whatever’s on our minds.

Speaking of The 2.0 Adoption Council, here’s a fabulous photo of a bunch of us after dinner on Wednesday night, graciously borrowed from our fearless concierge, Susan Scrupski, who was also brave enough to host a workshop with a bunch of us presenting, as well as an entire conference track.  You can check out the presentations from the workshop we gave on SlideShare.

AC1 

 

Secondly, the ability to hear what other companies are doing, what’s working and what’s not, how they’re handling challenges like getting folks to their communities, dealing with critics, increasing engagement, tackling that ever-challenging ROI question, and a multitude of other topics, is priceless. Whether you’re just starting your journey, or well into it like we are at EMC, this conference has something for everyone. A huge kudos to Steve Wylie, Super Woman Paige Finkleman and the whole cast and Advisory Board for another great conference!

Some quick observations around persistent themes:

  • A lot of companies are seeing successful results by enabling their employees to connect and collaborate with one another in easier ways than they have previously been able to do
  • A lot of companies are still trying to figure this out, and are interested in getting started – I met a lot of newbies at the conference, and it’s really great to see that there is still passion and enthusiasm for enabling employees to do their jobs better, faster and smarter
  • There is quickly becoming a large group of us who are hungry for more information than just at the beginner level. We’ve been in this space for 4 years externally and 3 years internally at EMC, and I’m looking to take it to the next level. So are a lot of others.
  • Lots of folks still seeming largely stumped by the ROI question. My answer – it’s a mix of both qualitative and quantitative measures.  Separately, they don’t mean a thing, but together, you can highlight savings, efficiency, and the power of networking and collaboration, so that it’s no longer a question of whether or not it’s providing tangible business results.
  • There is clearly a need for conferences like Enterprise 2.0 to bring together the folks that are trying to make this stuff work in their organizations – both business and IT folks.

As I mentioned before, we’ve been doing this for a long time at EMC, longer than most, in fact, and I’ve been in the thick of it the whole way through.  Here are some things that would take the Enterprise 2.0 conference to the next level for me (I also shared this feedback with the crew at the wrap up Town Hall session on Thursday afternoon):

  • More practitioners and their case studies – I love the knowledge that the high caliber consultants bring to the table, but I also want and frankly need to hear from people sitting in the same seat I am. I think there is a healthy place for both consultants and practitioners, and I just want to ensure we don’t lose sight of that as we move towards the future.
  • I totally get the fact that vendors need to make money, and showcasing their products at a conference like Enterprise 2.0 is one way to do that. That said, I do not want to see vendor demos in the Keynotes portion without a bit of thought leadership thrown in the mix, as well. Tell about your product, but also tell me how it addresses my pain points, and the pain points of my people, my organization. Don’t just walk me through screens and show me clicks. I want to know that you understand me and can help me.
  • I’d like to see differentiation between levels of expertise (or put another way - your place in the journey) for the sessions – nothing to scientific, just a bit of differentiation with case studies at each level of companies considering or that have already implemented some type of offering to their employees:
  • 1.     Beginner – Thinking about Enterprise 2.0 tools, but haven’t implemented? Thinking about how to make the business case? Thinking about how to get started? Thinking about planning for staffing, metrics, community managers, roles and responsibilities, etc? Just implemented within the past 6 months and still getting things moving?

    2.     Intermediate – Implemented more than 6 months ago, but still working to move things forward in your organization? Interested in adoption ideas? Interested in dealing with critics and naysayers? Interested in identifying and tackling under-penetrated pockets within your organization?

    3.     Advanced – Implemented more than a year or two ago? Interested in sustaining the vibrancy, momentum, adoption and engagement in your community?

  • There was mention of including industry information for sessions, and I agree with this – it’s helpful to know what companies in different industries are doing, especially in highly regulated industries.
  • More time for Q&A in all sessions – I can’t tell you how many times a session went on with folks talking, talking, talking, and then someone looked up and “Oops. Looks like we’re out of time for questions.” That’s a real bummer, and frankly, quite a loss. After all, aren’t we there to learn from one another? I know I always have questions at these sessions, but there’s never enough time baked in for audience questions. I’d like to see sessions planned with half the time for the presenters/panel/whatever and half the time reserved for audience questions. And I'd really like to see speakers stick to this format.
  • Finally, I need to see a coming together of the internal E 2.0 worlds and the external social media worlds. As I said in the Town Hall, there are many people like me who have an identity crisis and are tasked with further both internal E 2.0 initiatives, as well as further external social media and community initiatives and awareness. I'd like to see those worlds beginning to come together, and I think we have enough folks focusing on both that it would be a worthwhile endeavor to include a social media track in coming years.  

Overall, a fantastic conference, and by far, one of my favorites every year. In fact, I’d say, even if you can’t afford the full pass – get the free Expo pass and come network with folks at the conference. You won’t be disappointed. I promise.

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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