marketing

Are you listening? Opportunity's a knocking here at EMC again!

Opportunity's Knocking We're looking to add a few key team members to our family over here at EMC!  Take a look and see if you're interested! Please submit your resume through our resume system and feel free to let me know you did so, so that we can be on the lookout for it.

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Re-posted from Len Devanna's Blog

Got a passion for all things online?

Does the vanity plate on your car start with http://?

Do you *love* helping others understand and leverage the power of the web?

If so, you may be interested in a couple of cool opportunities here at EMC. We're looking for two talented folks to join our Digital Strategy Team. Sound interesting? Read on for more info...

Some disclaimers first...

As much as I love to receive resumes through Yammer, Utterz, and Twitter, I'd ask that anyone interested go through the normal channel of submission. Basically, that means follow the relevant link below and submit your resume.

Also, some browsers struggle with deep links into our recruiting system. If you click a link and get a 'cookies not accepted' error or similar, just grab the REQ ID for the respective job and try a search for it here.

So - who are we looking for?

The first opportunity (REQ ID 49681BR) is for a Sr. Project Manager / Web Consultant. We're looking for  someone who has a deep understanding and a passion for the online space. A collaborative individual who can lead complex web projects, help others understand and leverage the online channel, and help drive the ongoing definition and execution of our digital road map.

A team player is key - and the right candidate should feel at home discussing the evolution of the social web, enterprise 2.0, rich media, SEO and SEM, etc;.  Experience deploying / managing large web sites and leading cross functional teams is a plus here.

 

Next up, an opportunity for a Project Manager / Web Publisher (REQ ID 49680BR). We're looking for an individual to help advance EMC's corporate Intranet, working closely with contributing groups to ensure business objectives are met. 

The successful candidate here should have experience building and maintaining web sites, including UI / UX experience, familiarity with design and production tools (Photoshop, Dreamweaver, etc;), strong attention to detail and solid communication / project management skills. Experience with Intranets obviously a plus.

I've shared a bit in the past about my take on EMC's corporate culture. Suffice it to say a talented, passionate and motivated individual can build one heck of a career here. Interested? Submit your credentials and let's talk!


A New Year, A New EMC Information Calendar

EMC's 2010 Information Calendar and widget is out in full force - have you checked it out yet? If not, you should! Packed with 365 days of fun photos and interesting facts, it's a fun addition to any blog or website! A cool new feature this year is the ability to add notes and keep track of interesting dates, appointments, birthdays, meetings - all that stuff you don't want to forget. And the best part is, it's all private, so you don't have to worry about anyone finding out that you celebrate your dog's birthday every year with a special doggy cake and ice cream, not that there's anything wrong with that!

Enjoy!


Enterprise 2.0 is still alive and well, thank you very much

Me & My Rockstar Pass I am just back from a week in San Francisco attending the Enterprise 2.0 Conference in San Fran as a featured speaker along with a whole host of other industry experts. Those of us that were on the keynote stage got “backstage passes” and felt a bit like rock stars walking around. Thanks to everyone who made it possible for me to attend a great conference!

For my part, I participated in a panel with five other members from the 2.0 Adoption Council entitled “Is Enterprise 2.0 a Crock?”  I’ll share more on the panel and the whole idea of E 2.0 “crock-i-ness” in general in another post, as I’d like to get my overall conference thoughts down here first as well as share some advice based on ongoing discussions I had with folks at the conference that I hope to be helpful to them, as well as anyone else trying to do this. 

PanelSmall Photo courtesy of @adunne's Flickr Photostream. Panel left to right: Greg Lowe, Megan Murray, Bryce Williams, me, Bruce Galinksy, and Claire Flanagan. (I took a few photos, too, at the conference, though not nearly as good as Alex's.)

I have to say that I enjoyed the conference and the city of San Francisco. The weather was exceptionally nice and the city is amazing, even though I only saw a very small portion of its loveliness due to being inside most of the time.  But nothing compared to the opportunity to meet not only my friends from the 2.0 Adoption Council - Susan Scrupski our Founder, Andy McAfee, Greg Lowe, Megan Murray, Bryce Williams, Bruce Galinksy, Claire Flanagan, Timo Elliott, Hamilton Pridgen, Bert Sandie, and Donna Lucas - in person, but also so many other folks so passionate about the topic of Enterprise 2.0. I am proud to be a member of the 2.0 Adoption Council, and a part of the Enterprise 2.0 conference, as both have done great things for me on many levels.

One thing that’s still very clear to me from the conference, and the folks that I talked to there, is that Enterprise 2.0 is alive and well in terms of both interest in “cracking the code” of rollout and implementation as well as interest in and a hunger for examples of companies that are doing it and doing it well. It’s refreshing to work for a company (EMC) that’s considered to be ahead of the curve in terms of strategy, deployment, and adoption of Enterprise 2.0 tools and behaviors behind the firewall. I know that we still have a lot of learning and work ahead of us, but it’s neat to hear what folks think of what we’ve done so far, and of course to know that I’ve been in the thick of it.

So, how does one go about thinking about and preparing to launch an Enterprise 2.0 initiative? Here’s my advice on questions you need to ask yourself and be able to answer before moving forward. I’ll be elaborating on these questions in future posts:

How do you pitch the idea and to whom?

Understanding the key stakeholders and influences that need to be involved in the initiative and decision-making will go a long way towards a successful rollout. My recommendation is to define your goals and try to include key stakeholders from as many cross-functional teams as makes sense for your organization. This will hopefully reduce the number of times you may have to go back and re-pitch and refine the plan.

How do you determine what tools to use?

Understanding your goals will lead you towards tools. My recommendation would be to start smaller and more concise to meet specific goals you’ve identified and add new functionality as your users request it - providing too many bells and whistles up front will likely turn users off.

How do you secure executive sponsorship and program funding?

Getting an executive sponsor for your initiative who “gets it” and can articulate the value of the tools you’re proposing, as well as actually use them, is going to be key to your initiative.  You’ll also want to be honest with your budgetary needs – nothing is free, not even if the software’s free – it’s still going to take someone’s time (and time is money, after all), to roll out the initiative. My recommendation is to start with a pilot or beta program to get folks interested in the offering and then scale up as needed as new users join.

How do you educate on the tools?

Educating on the tool(s) that you choose is going to be key for a successful initiative. Too often, we make assumptions about people’s level of knowledge on any particular tool or subject. My advice is that you’re going to need to prepare beginner, intermediate, and advanced training materials in multiple formats to have a truly successful educational program.

How do you roll it out to the company?

When it’s time for go-live, you’re going to need to determine how you’re going to roll it out and to whom – will it be the whole company or a sample group of folks? You’ll also want to consider any marketing and communications channels you’ll be able to take advantage of to increase awareness. My recommendation is to also have a plan in place with consistent messaging for your advocates and evangelists to take advantage of when they share the tools with others. This will help to keep the messaging consistent and avoid confusion as to what the tools are for.

How do you handle the naysayers, those that don't see the value or support the idea?

See my previous blog post on this one.

How do you measure the impact and success?

You will inevitably want to consider the measurements you will take into account to consider your initiative a success. There are lots of different measures that can be captured, and each organization is different. My recommendation is to gain insights from your key stakeholders as to what they might consider a measure of success and then propose a phase 1 list to folks for consideration. As the tools and their use evolves, so too can your measures of success.

In summary, the key ingredients for any Enterprise 2.0 initiative are:

  • Executive sponsorship
  • Funding
  • Defined goals/purpose
  • Defined “rules of engagement”
  • Partnerships are key (IT, HR, Legal, PR, Business Units, etc.)
  • Group of passionate folks
  • Patience
  • Perhaps a leap of faith

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 Jamie 

 Blog: http://www.jamiepappas.com

 Twitter: http://twitter.com/jamiepappas


Captivated by the force that is Gravity Summit, Boston 2009

Gravity Summit This past Monday, I had the absolute pleasure of attending Gravity Summit at the Harvard Faculty Club in Cambridge, Massachusetts put on by social media wizards Beverly Macy (also teaches social media marketing at UCLA) and Rodney Rumford (also co-founder of TweetPhoto which I’m looking forward to checking out!) 

The line-up for the day included big name brands sharing their social media experiences, strategy and advice for using social media successfully.  And the folks in attendance literally came from all over the country to witness the event, which speaks of the level of information one can achieve when attending.

Me, Hammer and Carina Cristiano Leoni @ Gravity Summit, Harvard

Hammer

MC Hammer – Life-long entrepreneur, blogger, tweeter, rapper, and all around nice guy - need I say more?

Gary Vaynerchuk – Also a life-long entrepreneur, creator and host of the famous Wine Library TV, and newly published book author

Troy Kelley – EVP & Chief Digital Officer @ Arnold Worldwide

Andy Mitchell – VP of Digital & Development Marketing @ CNN

Todd Defren – Principal @ Shift Communications

Josh Levine – Rebel Industries

Scott Gulbransen – PR & Social Media @ Intuit

Wendy Harman – Social Media Manager @ American Red Cross

Christi Day – Social Media Maven @ Southwest Airlines

Mike Spataro – VP @ Visible Technologies

David Puner (aka Dunkin Dave) – Social Media Manager @ Dunkin Donuts

Ramon deLeon (aka The Pizza Guy to Know in Chicago) – COO @ Domino’s Pizza Chicago

Polly Pearson – VP of Employment Brand & Strategy @ EMC Corp

If you missed the live streaming of the event on CNN.com/live on Monday, you can view videos of some of the folks on my YouTube Channel (some also embedded below). Hard to pick a favorite…Of course, I know EMC’s story very well, since I live it every day and am proud to be a part of the force and strategy.

Rather than do a play-by-play of the day, I thought I’d summarize the key points by picking a few keywords to describe the ongoing message of the entire day at Gravity Summit. I’d have to say they are listen, learn, engage, and empower.

Listen

Listen to what people are saying about your brand, whether it’s your personal brand or your company brand. Listen. Listen to what is being said, take it in, and use it as an opportunity to learn. In the opening remarks with Beverly Macy and Rodney Rumford, it was said “even if you’re never going to use social media in your business, you need to know how to listen to what your customers are saying.” I couldn’t agree more.

Learn

Learn from what is being said by others. There is an unprecedented ability to gain insights into what people are saying about your brand like never before through all social media channels. It’s like having the ability to finally be the fly on the wall we’ve all wanted to be at some point. As Rodney Rumford said “use social media to solicit feedback and be ready for what you’re going to hear – the good, the bad, and the ugly.” Take it as an opportunity to learn how to be a better brand and educate. Negative comments are such a huge opportunity to learn and keep people engaged. And, as Polly Pearson said, if people are complaining, it’s a sign they still care.

Engage

Engage with people via social media. I’ve always said that people want to connect with people, not nameless, faceless brands. Troy Kelley shared “markets are reporting getting more engagement out of social media than any other traditional marketing tools,” so now is your chance to get out there, engage, and be the central voice for your brand. As Hammer said, “perception has trumped reality, and if you’re allowing somebody else to control the perception of your brand, you’re in trouble […] being at the center of the flow of information about you and your brand is the key to managing your brand.”

Empower

Empower others to not only find out about your brand via social media, but also empower your employees to use social media in a transparent way. I agree with Gary Vaynerchuk that “social media’s power and potential are massively underrated.” I love Todd Defren’s take on social media: “social media is not about public relations, it's about public relationships […] social media is not about creating something new every day, but leveraging what you already have in creative ways.” It’s all about empowering people to take advantage of the opportunities social media presents to them and using social media to enhance information and relationships as we know them.

The only constructive feedback I have is that it seems like people were jumping out of their seats to engage with the presenters a bit more, and at times things felt a bit rushed. So, perhaps having one or two fewer presenters with a touch more time for Q&A would be a good thing? Hard to say for sure, but I’d love to see a bit more interactivity in the summit. After all, social media is about having conversations and building relationships.

All in all, a fantastic summit! My first of many, I hope! Kudos to Beverly and Rodney for a fantastic showing and event!

A few vids I shot from the event. See more on my YouTube Channel

MC Hammer Keynote, Part 1


 



Gary Vaynerchuk Keynote, Part 1 

 


Polly Pearson, EMC Case Study, Part 1

   


Todd Defren, Shift Communications, Part 1 

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 Jamie 

 Blog: http://jamiepappas.typepad.com/ 

 Twitter: http://twitter.com/jamiepappas

 


Clever Marketing by @GariFusion during PCB4

MarketingGenius I was browsing through tweets tagged with the #pcb4 hashtag for this past weekend’s PodCamp 4 in Boston when I came across what I thought was a genius marketing campaign on Twitter for Brookline sushi restaurant Gari Japanese Fusion


These people have worked it out – they locate local events in the Boston area, pick up on the hashtag and then tweet specials and coupons to the attendees around dinner time. It’s absolute genius if you ask me. 

More restaurants looking to get into using Twitter should take their lead and try to catch the eye of event attendees by tweeting the specials to their event hashtag. 

Very cool marketing plan that seems to be working out well for them! Can’t wait to try their sushi! 

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 Jamie