Enter the #EMC xCP xCelerator Challenge #xcpContest & Win!

Xcpchallenge
Show off your xCP chops and share your creations to help the xCP community build powerful solutions more quickly. Enter a winning xCelerator and you can share in the $50,000 prize pool!

What is the xCP xCelerator Challenge?

The xCP xCelerator Challenge is a contest that invites EMC Documentum customers, partners, and employees to submit working xCelerators to the xCP xCelerator xChange, a library of xCelerators contributed by the xCP community. The entries will be judged by the community and a panel of experts, and winners will share a $50,000 prize pool.

What Is An xCelerator?

An xCelerator is one or more assets that can be used to accelerate the creation, adoption, and/or implementation of an xCP solution. An xCelerator is not necessarily a complete, running application; instead, it is intended to hasten application development by providing key pieces of functionality.

What Types of xCelerators are Eligible for the Challenge?

For this Challenge, we're looking for executable (working) sample applications or single-purpose xCelerator assets. See the Judging Criteria for a complete description of the contest categories.

Who Can Enter?

The Challenge is open to all Documentum customers, partners, and employees.

Submission Categories

Each submission must be in one of three categories:

  1. Sample Application: Needs to provide the foundation for an end to end case management or BPM solution, covering the full lifecycle from creation to completion. An example is the Grants Management sample application that is provided with the xCP product.
  2. xCelerator Asset: A standalone component that can be plugged into any xCP application. Examples that are included with xCP include the Advanced Search xCelerator and several Activity Template xCelerators.
  3. Employee Submission: The best xCelerator submitted by an EMC employee. Employees may submit either type of xCelerator, but only one prize will be awarded.

We're looking for submissions that are executable or deployable to a working xCP application. That means xCP Design Patterns are not eligible for this contest (although you're encouraged to contribute those as well to help raise your community status).

What are the Prizes?

One cash prize will be awarded in each of the following categories:

  • Best Sample Application: $20,000
  • Best xCelerator Asset: $10,000
  • Best Employee Entry: $10,000

Plus, each of the three winning teams will receive one conference pass plus expenses to participate in an expert panel at the next EMC World, May 2011 in Las Vegas (total of 3 passes).

An Added Bonus!

Network with others across the entire EMC Documentum Developer Network!!

Sounds Great! How Do I Enter?

See How, What, and When to Submit your xCelerator

Timelines

  • Contest opens October 26th 2010 at Momentum Lisbon
  • All entries due by midnight Pacific Time, December 31 2010
  • Community posting of finalists and voting starts mid-January 2011
  • Voting complete early February 2011
  • Winners announced early March 2011
  • Winners present on Expert Panel at Momentum at EMC World May 2011

 

So, come on! Get your game on!! We want to hear from you!!

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

 

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Reblog: @amcafee's Do's/Don'ts for Work Social Platforms

Just read an excellent post by Andy McAfee (no shock there) that I think everyone should read when it comes to your employer's social platforms.

My comments on Andy's post illustrate a couple of "adds" to the list, but I'll share them here, as well. Be sure to check out all the comments on Andy's original blog post - lots of other great ideas and suggestions!

Do: Add value, be relevant - what you're doing in your work's social platform should be of value to and be relevant for the community that's congregated there. One of our "asks" is "content in context" - don't post about your project/work/etc in the middle of a conversation that has nothing to do with it. If you can make a connection, great! If you can't, how in the world do you expect others to do so? As a sidebar, if you can relate your work to the company strategy, especially big campaigns, activities, initiatives, etc. that's a win (at least at EMC, it is) - it helps others see how you're integrated in at the company and perhaps how they can be too.

Don't: Don't make it look like you have nothing else to do other than participate in the community unless that's explicitly what you're paid to do. Make sure you jump in to relevant conversations, share information and best practices, comment on others' content and conversations - but do not feel compelled to jump into ever conversation, reply to every post and generally make folks wonder what it is you really do for your company.

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Reblog:  Do's and Don'ts for Your Work's Social Platforms by Andrew McAfee 

 

Andrew_mcafee1-thumb-386x349

Do's and Don'ts for Your Work's Social Platforms

11:25 AM Tuesday September 28, 2010  | Comments (20)

Emergent social software platforms — the enabling technologies of the 2.0 Era — are being deployed by enterprises at a rapid rate. Companies as varied as Microsoft, Spigit, Salesforce, Jive, Socialtext, and IBM now all offer enterprise social offerings for customers.

This brings up an important question: what are Enterprise 2.0best practices for individuals? Should an employee use her company's social networking software just like she uses her Facebook account? Should she microblog the same way she uses Twitter?

I say no. Enterprise 2.0 is not Web 2.0; corporate technologies are different than personal ones, even if they look and feel the same. They're there to support the work of the organization, not to let individuals do and say whatever they want.

As I've argued for some time, though, there's no deep incompatibility between these two use cases. The autonomous and personalized actions and interactions of people, facilitated by technology, can be a great benefit to the enterprise, because this work creates new knowledge and fosters novel connections.

So here are some recommendations about how to use these tools to simultaneously advance your own work, make your existence and expertise better known throughout a digital community, and benefit the organization as a whole. I'll divide them into three categories: things to do (in other words, positive ways to use Enterprise 2.0 technologies), things not to do, and gray areas — use cases I'm not sure about.

Things To Do

  • Narrate your work. Talk both about work in progress (the projects you're in the middle of, how they're coming, what you're learning, and so on), and finished goods (the projects, reports, presentations, etc. you've executed). This lets others discover what you know and what you're good at. It also makes you easier to find, and so increases the chances you can be a helpful colleague to someone. Finally, it builds your personal reputation and 'brand.'
  • Point to others' work, and provide commentary on it. When you come across something noteworthy, point to it and discuss why you think it's important. Chances are others would like to know about it. And include a link to the original source; people love links.
  • Comment and discuss. Post comments to others' blogs, join the conversations taking place on forums, and keep the social media discussions lively. Doing so will let others hear your voice, and also make them more likely to participate themselves.
  • Ask and answer questions. Don't just broadcast what you know; also broadcast your ignorance from time to time. Let the crowd help you if you're stuck. Most people and organizations are very pleasantly surprised by the amount of altruism unlocked by Enterprise 2.0.
  • Vote, like, give kudos, etc. Lots of social software platforms these days have tools for voting or signaling that you like something. Use them; they help provide structure to the community as a whole and let people know where the good stuff and real experts are. They also make you more popular.
  • Talk about social stuff going on at the company. Give a recap of the softball game, talk about plans for the holiday party, show how close the group is to its fundraising goal, and so on. Organizations are social places, and I think it's a shortsighted shame when E2.0 platforms are all business, all the time. However, it's often a good idea to give non-work stuff its own dedicated place on the platform so that people can avoid it if they want to.

Things Not To Do

  • Be narcissistic. Don't talk about what you had for lunch or how you're peeved that one more of your flights got delayed. It's selfish clutter, and serves no larger purpose. We all have lunches and delayed flights.
  • Gossip. Why on Earth would you want to be publicly identified as a rumormonger?
  • Be unsubstantiated. Your unsupported, shoot-from-the-hip, fact-and-logic free arguments and opinions are really uninteresting and unhelpful. If you're not willing to do the homework necessary to back up your points, don't bother making them.
  • Mock others or launch personal attacks. I had a friend who walked out of his performance review and tweeted about his boss's bad cufflinks. I thought this was a deeply bad idea. So are flame wars and trolling. Debates and disagreements are vital components of E2.0 communities, but like Samuel Johnson said, "honesty is not greater where elegance is less."
  • Discuss sex, politics, or religion. My dad tells me that these were the three taboo topics in the officer's mess when he was in the Navy. They seem like good taboos to keep in place with E2.0; it's just too easy to upset people and start nasty, pointless fights on these subjects. Of course, this these taboos don't really apply if you work at Playboy Enterprises or Focus on the Family.

Gray Areas

  • Humor. We all like a good laugh, but we also all have different and deeply-held notions about the boundaries among funny, unfunny, and offensive. Sharing humor with colleagues you don't know well is a stroll through a minefield.
  • Self-praise. It's great to hear positive things about our own work, and the temptation to pass them on is strong. I've given in to this temptation, but afterward I've felt like I've blown my own horn a little too loud. So these days I'm trying not to retweet compliments.
  • Unsolicited opinions on topics far from your own work. The CIO of a large retail insurance company told me a little while back that he was tired of employees using his blog's comment section to offer their views on the company's latest advertising campaign. I feel his pain. At the same time, however, I think it's critical that people not feel constrained to use E2.0 platforms to only talk about the stuff in their job descriptions. Maybe one way forward here is to stress that people's contributions need to be substantiated, as discussed above.

What do you think of these recommendations? Am I on track, or way off? And how do you handle the gray areas? Leave a comment, please, and let me know.

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas

 

 

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Mixed Feelings on The Social Network : A Movie Review

Courtesy of http://www.thesocialnetwork-movie.com/ My husband and I went to see "The Social Network" this past weekend. Admittedly, I had mixed feelings about the movie. When he mentioned that he wanted to see the movie, I wrinkled my nose and sighed an "Oh no....Really?" Turns out he was most interested in the movie more because of it's soundtrack by Trent Reznor than the "story of Facebook," although that was an interesting aspect, as well.  Admittedly, the Reznor angle got me a little more interested, as well (Nine Inch Nails is one of my favorites).

The good news is that the movie wasn't as bad as I was anticipating it would be - the story is a mildly interesting one, even if Mark Zuckerberg does call it fiction

It wasn't a horrible movie, but it didn't make me walk out of the theater thinking "I'm going to recommend that movie to everyone" either. The notion of it being a "picture of the year" candidate is laughable. It's certainly nowhere near that caliber of movie.

I like Facebook as much as the next person. Probably more if you consider the fact that I opt to use Facebook as a part of my job - in fact, I develop and execute the social media strategy, inclusive of Facebook, for EMC Corporation. But this is not a "picture of the year" candidate, folks. There is, frankly, nothing about this movie that screams picture of the year to me. I just don't get that notion. Not one bit. Are we "there" now -- where the fad of social media has everyone raving over a mediocre story? Really?

Putting aside the fact that we watched the process of website development for over 2 hours, and a bunch of teenagers teeter between loving and hating one another (not all that uncommon -- or interesting, either), and selfishly vying to be the "owner" of the next-big-thing -- what I did like about the movie was the wit in some of the characters and the moments when there was clever banter back and forth. Although the movie's "Mark" was a jerk in the opening scene, the banter back and forth with his girlfriend was amusing to follow. Do people really talk like that? 

There were also even some emotional moments along the journey. I teetered between thinking Mark was a two-faced jerk and feeling sorry for him for for essentially throwing all of his friends away in the effort of claiming credit or owning the idea and creation of Facebook, or so the story goes in the movie. It's just sad, all the way around to see how people can fall apart under pressure. 

So at the end of the day, I was entertained during some parts, bored or annoyed during others, and overall would say this wasn't a horrible movie, but wasn't great either. I'd say that the $22.4 million it brought in over the weekend agrees. 

 

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Jamie 

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



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Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

Had an absolute blast catching up with Thomas Jones (aka @Niketown588) last week along with social media cohorts @LenDevanna and @ThomLytle. Check it out and let us all know what you think! 

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Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

This weeks special guests are Jamie Pappas (@JamiePappas), Len Devanna (@LenDevanna) and Thom Lytle (@ThomLytle). Jamie is the author of Social Media & Enterprise 2.0 Musings. Len is the author of Confessions of an eBiz Junkie. All three are the maestros of social media integration at EMC. Tune in and listen to this special podcast as Jamie, Len and Thom give us insight into:
  • How EMC|ONE is the catalyst to blogging 
  • How social media ties into peoples sense of belonging
  • How to make social media a value add for you
  • Social Networking and Your Personal Brand
  • Jamie's role in social media adoption among women
  • EXCLUSIVE EMC World 2011 Bloggers Lounge Update
  • Similarity between Jamie's childhood and mine
  • Thom's new blog site
  • and much much more

You can subscribe/listen to Coffee With Thomas via iTunes.

Link to Podcast: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMCs Social Media Maestros

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Join EMC in the Social Space!

EMC Blogs, Twitter, Facebook, & LinkedIn 

 

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Explore Our World of Communities



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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



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Another EMC Community Job Opportunity Coming Your Way!

Opportunity's Knocking We're looking to add a few key team members to our family over here at EMC!  Take a look and see if you're interested! Please submit your resume through our resume system and feel free to let me know you did so, so that we can be on the lookout for it.

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Re-posted from Len Devanna's Blog


 

With Social Media becoming an increasingly important part of how we engage online, we're looking for some top talent to come join the team. Specifically, we're looking for a senior community manager type to help shape the future of EMC's community offerings.

If you have a strong passion for the social web, thrive in a highly collaborative team environment, and want to help build the future of digital communications, you may want to give this opportunity a close look. We're looking for someone who has successfully conceptualized, deployed and managed large and thriving B2B communities.

Sound interesting? Check this and other EMC opportunities out at the careers section of EMC.com. Candidates interested in this particular opportunity should search and submit your credentials against Req ID 59488BR.

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



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EMC Guarantee Goes Viral!

In case you haven't noticed, EMC's been pumping out viral videos for our EMC 20% Unified Storage Guarantee. There's something for everyone. Check them out!

The latest is this classic: The Prince of Dataness


And in case you missed the other two:

EMC's own Bill Scannell takes on Pro Billy Andrade

These rock stars made it to #6 on the AdAge Charts!

CHiPs Erik Estrada makes a return just for EMC!

This pro made it to #6 on the AdAge Charts and #2 on YouTube in Science & Technology! 

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas


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Opportunity's a knocking here at EMC - Check out EMC's Open Community Roles

Opportunity's KnockingWe're looking to add a few key team members to our family over here at EMC! Check them out and see if you're interested!

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Community Development Manager

 

Responsible for helping to build  EMC Community Network on-line community engagement strategy working closely with business unit marketing, product and technical teams to build an effective community footprint across public and private domains.  The position is based in Hopkinton, MA. A few of the fun things this team member does:

  • Provides consulting, training and support for community managers with the following direction and support
  • Maintains and constantly improves ECN Inside and Admin Corner, internal community resources that support large scale community on-boarding and growth.
  • Responsible for driving the value and growth of EMC’s Expert program; a member reputation reward initiative that identifies and promotes highly active community members. 
  • Drives content on EMC Community Network that promotes member discovery and engagement with appropriate communities 
  • Creates new self-serve tools and training modules to improve community manager competency    
  • Drives monthly community manager summits that encourage best practice sharing and problem solving 
  • Creates blogs, videos, tweets and other content that can be used across social media properties to drive awareness of  EMC communities

Sound like a great fit or want to learn more or how to apply? Check out the full job description here.
 

 


Online Community Manager, Information Intelligence Group (formerly Content Management & Archiving)

 

 EMC provides online communities for developers, customers, and partners who use EMC Documentum and Information Governance products and technologies. These communities contain a number of expanding resources including technical articles, code samples, discussion groups, and free Developer Editions of select products. Due to extraordinary growth in the amount of content and the number of members, EMC requires a full-time Community Manager to steer the communities towards the next level of member engagement. The position is based in Pleasanton, CA.

 

The Community Manager will foster community involvement and encourage conversation about the technologies, applications, and solutions provided by EMC’s Information Intelligence Group. These communities bring together Documentum customers, employees, and partners in an online environment, and encourage open feedback and participation across all groups.  This position will work closely with the Social Media manager.


This is a hands-on role for someone to have a real and visible impact on the quality of EMC’s relationship with its partners and customers alike. Here are a few of the fun things you'll get to do in this role: 

  •  Lead the day-to-day operations of the hosted community in conjunction with internal community owners. 
  •  Establish metrics to track progress against community objectives. 
  • Map out a plan for improving the structure of the IIG communities that will increase participation, content visibility, and member satisfaction, as well as ensuring that the community provides a resource for researching the benefits and capabilities of Documentum products.
  • Develop member recognition and reward programs that will encourage participation and recognize valued contributors.
  • Develop training materials and guides to assist members with finding, navigating, and creating content 
  • Assist with loading and promoting of sponsored content created for the community by various product and support teams, including product marketing, product management, support, engineering, education, and consulting.

 

 

Sound like a great fit or want to learn more or how to apply? Check out the full job description here.

Let me know if you have any questions or don't hear back on either of these positions and I'll gladly make sure  your info gets to the hiring manager!

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



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Do you get social? A Peek into #EMC's Social Business Journey

And, more importantly, do you “get” social?  Jive does! Conversation  

A few weeks ago, on Friday, June 18th, I had the pleasure of being invited to present EMC’s Social Business Journey to a group of friendly folks at the last session of Jive Software’s Get Social Tour 2010. I’m saying 2010, because I sincerely hope there is a 2011, 2012, and every year thereafter! This was a great opportunity to meet and converse with folks at all stages in their social business journey, and I absolutely loved it!

For those that were not able to attend any of the Get Social sessions for a variety of reasons, I highly encourage you to join the Jive Community take a look at some of the stellar case studies presented along the journey and see if they might be helpful to you in yours.

The cliff notes on my presentation are in my deck, and hopefully will provide a good starting point for you. Please let me know if you find them helpful, what’s missing, or even what you’ve done in your journey differently that met your stakeholder needs. I always love hearing others’ stories about their social journeys so that I can learn and evolve our own journey.


EMC Case Study - Jive Get Social Tour

View more presentations from Jamie Pappas.

While I love sharing EMC’s story, I have to say that the true value of such events comes from the ability to converse with and learn from others who are at various points in their own journey to a social business. And I particularly love hearing what has worked and what has not, so that I can test that our in our waters.

There was definitely overlap among the persistent themes I mentioned about Enterprise 2.0 Conference in Boston that same week:

  • There is still a ton of interest in getting started in this space, which is great! People want to start community and collaborating efforts and are coming in droves to see what works best to get going.
  • A whole lot of companies have started their journey and are seeing positive results from enabling their employees to connect and collaborate with one another
  • There is a keen interest in learning what other companies are up to, what is working, what is not, and why.
  • The ROI question seems that it will never die, nor should it. But it’s also amazing to hear the stories of the level of push-back some folks have endured in their journey to get social. As I said before, my answer to the ever-challenging ROI question is it’s a mix of both qualitative and quantitative measures.  Separately, they don’t mean a thing, but together, you can highlight savings, efficiency, and the power of networking and collaboration, so that it’s no longer a question of whether or not it’s providing tangible business results.
  • In person conversation and collaboration is just as important as staying connected online. The buzz and conversation in the air the entire morning is the strongest testament to this reality that I can offer. People were excited to meet others going through the same things that they are and you could feel the excitement in the air! Bringing people together in person is still an essential part of learning, development and networking. I don’t believe that will fundamentally ever change.
  • Carrying on the conversation after the in-person get together is just as important – which is exactly why Jive is offering up a group for us all to continue the conversation!

 

In fact, I can’t emphasize this point enough. It’s a really, really tough job to drive forward any type of social business collaboration initiative within just about any organization. Staying in touch with those that have been on the same path for some time, and those that are just starting their journey will provide you with a network of invaluable resources and people to bounce ideas off of, learn from, and develop lasting friendships with.

Your network, both in real life and online, will be one of the most important tools in your arsenal of the journey you are about to embark upon

So, what are you waiting for? Go - Get Social now

And if you're a large company with over 10,000 employees, come get social with us at The 2.0 Adoption Council, too!

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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Taking Enterprise 2.0 to the Next Level. A Reflection on #E2Conf Boston

This past week, I had the pleasure of attending – for the third time in a row – Enterprise 2.0 Conference here in Boston, MA.  Some seriously amazing talent comes together each time the conference is held here in Boston, as well as on the west coast in sunny California. I’m truly honored to be a part of the conference, and have the ability to chat with such forward thinking people.

I love this conference for a multitude of reasons, but primarily it’s the face-to-face interactions and the real-life case studies and stories that get me excited every year. Why? First off, I love meeting the folks that I've chatted with all year long on various social networking sites, including my 2.0 Adoption Council colleagues, and it’s truly like getting together with a bunch of old friends, sharing stories, drinking beers and just generally talking about whatever’s on our minds.

Speaking of The 2.0 Adoption Council, here’s a fabulous photo of a bunch of us after dinner on Wednesday night, graciously borrowed from our fearless concierge, Susan Scrupski, who was also brave enough to host a workshop with a bunch of us presenting, as well as an entire conference track.  You can check out the presentations from the workshop we gave on SlideShare.

AC1 

 

Secondly, the ability to hear what other companies are doing, what’s working and what’s not, how they’re handling challenges like getting folks to their communities, dealing with critics, increasing engagement, tackling that ever-challenging ROI question, and a multitude of other topics, is priceless. Whether you’re just starting your journey, or well into it like we are at EMC, this conference has something for everyone. A huge kudos to Steve Wylie, Super Woman Paige Finkleman and the whole cast and Advisory Board for another great conference!

Some quick observations around persistent themes:

  • A lot of companies are seeing successful results by enabling their employees to connect and collaborate with one another in easier ways than they have previously been able to do
  • A lot of companies are still trying to figure this out, and are interested in getting started – I met a lot of newbies at the conference, and it’s really great to see that there is still passion and enthusiasm for enabling employees to do their jobs better, faster and smarter
  • There is quickly becoming a large group of us who are hungry for more information than just at the beginner level. We’ve been in this space for 4 years externally and 3 years internally at EMC, and I’m looking to take it to the next level. So are a lot of others.
  • Lots of folks still seeming largely stumped by the ROI question. My answer – it’s a mix of both qualitative and quantitative measures.  Separately, they don’t mean a thing, but together, you can highlight savings, efficiency, and the power of networking and collaboration, so that it’s no longer a question of whether or not it’s providing tangible business results.
  • There is clearly a need for conferences like Enterprise 2.0 to bring together the folks that are trying to make this stuff work in their organizations – both business and IT folks.

As I mentioned before, we’ve been doing this for a long time at EMC, longer than most, in fact, and I’ve been in the thick of it the whole way through.  Here are some things that would take the Enterprise 2.0 conference to the next level for me (I also shared this feedback with the crew at the wrap up Town Hall session on Thursday afternoon):

  • More practitioners and their case studies – I love the knowledge that the high caliber consultants bring to the table, but I also want and frankly need to hear from people sitting in the same seat I am. I think there is a healthy place for both consultants and practitioners, and I just want to ensure we don’t lose sight of that as we move towards the future.
  • I totally get the fact that vendors need to make money, and showcasing their products at a conference like Enterprise 2.0 is one way to do that. That said, I do not want to see vendor demos in the Keynotes portion without a bit of thought leadership thrown in the mix, as well. Tell about your product, but also tell me how it addresses my pain points, and the pain points of my people, my organization. Don’t just walk me through screens and show me clicks. I want to know that you understand me and can help me.
  • I’d like to see differentiation between levels of expertise (or put another way - your place in the journey) for the sessions – nothing to scientific, just a bit of differentiation with case studies at each level of companies considering or that have already implemented some type of offering to their employees:
  • 1.     Beginner – Thinking about Enterprise 2.0 tools, but haven’t implemented? Thinking about how to make the business case? Thinking about how to get started? Thinking about planning for staffing, metrics, community managers, roles and responsibilities, etc? Just implemented within the past 6 months and still getting things moving?

    2.     Intermediate – Implemented more than 6 months ago, but still working to move things forward in your organization? Interested in adoption ideas? Interested in dealing with critics and naysayers? Interested in identifying and tackling under-penetrated pockets within your organization?

    3.     Advanced – Implemented more than a year or two ago? Interested in sustaining the vibrancy, momentum, adoption and engagement in your community?

  • There was mention of including industry information for sessions, and I agree with this – it’s helpful to know what companies in different industries are doing, especially in highly regulated industries.
  • More time for Q&A in all sessions – I can’t tell you how many times a session went on with folks talking, talking, talking, and then someone looked up and “Oops. Looks like we’re out of time for questions.” That’s a real bummer, and frankly, quite a loss. After all, aren’t we there to learn from one another? I know I always have questions at these sessions, but there’s never enough time baked in for audience questions. I’d like to see sessions planned with half the time for the presenters/panel/whatever and half the time reserved for audience questions. And I'd really like to see speakers stick to this format.
  • Finally, I need to see a coming together of the internal E 2.0 worlds and the external social media worlds. As I said in the Town Hall, there are many people like me who have an identity crisis and are tasked with further both internal E 2.0 initiatives, as well as further external social media and community initiatives and awareness. I'd like to see those worlds beginning to come together, and I think we have enough folks focusing on both that it would be a worthwhile endeavor to include a social media track in coming years.  

Overall, a fantastic conference, and by far, one of my favorites every year. In fact, I’d say, even if you can’t afford the full pass – get the free Expo pass and come network with folks at the conference. You won’t be disappointed. I promise.

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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EMC Monster Mash 2010 Winners Announced at #EMCWorld

Some very cool things came out of EMC's recent Monster Mash Developer Challenge - check it out, and join me in congratulating the winners!

Have you joined the EMC Community Network yet? You should - you'll get to do fun things like this, as well as connect to customers, partners, peers, and folks all over the world who share a passion for technology!

On the last day of EMC World 2010, $30,000 in cash prizes were awarded to winners of the Monster Mash Developer Challenge. This contest, hosted by the EMC Developer Network (EDN), selected the best “mashups,” or composite applications, written using at least 2 different EMC platforms and, optionally, any industry software.

The goals of the Challenge were to showcase the breadth of EMC platforms, how straightforward it is for developers to use EDN resources to learn and develop apps based on many EMC platforms, and to provide “crowd sourced” software code, at no cost, for use by anyone in future development efforts.

 

Grand Prize and Documentum xCP - Game Content Services
Derrick

Derrick Lau

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Moster Mash Grand Prize - $15,000
Best Documentum xCP Mashup - $5,000

Provide video gamers a simple cost effective means of sharing customizations with one another.

The ability to customize game content, such as custom game characters is very popular amongst gamers. However finding an affordable accessible solution for sharing this content continues to be a challenge.  Game Content Services a proof of concept application submitted by Derrick Lau demonstrates a solid solution to this problem.

Technologies used in the mashup

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Derrick on the Monster Mash Challenge:

“The Monster Mash Challenge has been a very rewarding experience.  Using EDN, I was able to quickly learn enough about Atmos Online, to include it in my mashup. I intend to use Atmos Online again in my consulting practice specializing in Documentum-based solutions, as well as for my personal interest in sharing game content in the cloud with other indie developers.”


Best  Atmos Mashup -  Metaconomy Storage Monitor

Richard

Richard Blackham


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Best Atmos Mashup - $5,000

The Metaconomy Storage Monitor is a tool that can be used by EMC and their channel partners to gather data via the web on storage status of all of their customer’s storage implementations.

"The Storage Monitor", can aid the EMC channel to accurately manage data harvested and aggregated from customer implementations of:

The purpose is for EMC and their channel to be able to have:
  • Point in time visibility of sales status on a day by day basis
  • Drive stronger compliance standards through the EMC channel
  • More pro-active towards their customers by delivering better service
  • To better know more about their customers, and
  • be positioned to grow the business
Technologies used in the mashup

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Richard on the Monster Mash Challenge:

“The Monster Mash Challenge gave developers both the tools and the encouragement to tackle something new and grow.  It provided EMC with a broad perspective of the many ways developers can quickly and easily create new innovative apps…ideas that EMC might never have considered before, like gaming, desktop management tools or our very own storage data harvesting tool  integrated into our channel performance management solution.“ 


Best  Employee Mashup - Tech Notes Authoring Solution


Junaid Asifali

Junaid Asifali

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Best Employee Mashup - $5000

One of the important activities of a technical support organization is to create a body of knowledge that can be used and shared with both customers and internal employees. This knowledge typically takes the form of technical notes which document known solutions to specific problems. Apart from the main support site, these solutions may be referenced by other internal and external websites.

Tech Notes allows technical support organizations to create support notes which can be shared with both customers and internal employees. The solution uses Documentum xCP for the content authoring process and xDB to store the approved solution and Atmos to store any binary documents which support the solution. The goal is to achieve this with minimal coding.

Technologies used in the mashup

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Junaid on the Monster Mash Challenge

“Our team provides support to Documentum developers. We enjoyed working as a team and doing something creative. Instead of troubleshooting issues and reviewing code, we were able to use our skills to build a solution that is both useful and relevant.”           


Honorable  Mention - NoteFly with EMC

  Fan


Fan Wu

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Honorable Mention

NoteFly with EMC is a simple application mashing up all EMC repository-like products from a simple Note.

A Post-It-Note Desktop program that resides in the System Tray of most Windows desktop operating systems.

It's more than a normal passive Post-It “Note” in that you can:

  • Post quick notes to various EMC repositories so your insights and information are captured right away
  • Receive EMC repositories’ statuses automatically and pop up a flashing note on your screen if there is a problem
  • A "command-like" natural language command can be sent back to the server so that the server can do various jobs
  • Demonstrates cross platform cryptography, encryption with .NET and decryption with RSA BSAFE for Java
  • Web Service which provides Encryption on Demand
  • Base64 encoding in both Java and C# for rendering Atmos URL
Technologies used in the mashup Read more >>

Other Finalists  Building_blocks_5


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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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