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Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

Had an absolute blast catching up with Thomas Jones (aka @Niketown588) last week along with social media cohorts @LenDevanna and @ThomLytle. Check it out and let us all know what you think! 

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Reblog: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMC's Social Media Maestros

This weeks special guests are Jamie Pappas (@JamiePappas), Len Devanna (@LenDevanna) and Thom Lytle (@ThomLytle). Jamie is the author of Social Media & Enterprise 2.0 Musings. Len is the author of Confessions of an eBiz Junkie. All three are the maestros of social media integration at EMC. Tune in and listen to this special podcast as Jamie, Len and Thom give us insight into:
  • How EMC|ONE is the catalyst to blogging 
  • How social media ties into peoples sense of belonging
  • How to make social media a value add for you
  • Social Networking and Your Personal Brand
  • Jamie's role in social media adoption among women
  • EXCLUSIVE EMC World 2011 Bloggers Lounge Update
  • Similarity between Jamie's childhood and mine
  • Thom's new blog site
  • and much much more

You can subscribe/listen to Coffee With Thomas via iTunes.

Link to Podcast: Coffee With Thomas Episode 8 - EMCs Social Media Maestros

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: @JamiePappas



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Taking Enterprise 2.0 to the Next Level. A Reflection on #E2Conf Boston

This past week, I had the pleasure of attending – for the third time in a row – Enterprise 2.0 Conference here in Boston, MA.  Some seriously amazing talent comes together each time the conference is held here in Boston, as well as on the west coast in sunny California. I’m truly honored to be a part of the conference, and have the ability to chat with such forward thinking people.

I love this conference for a multitude of reasons, but primarily it’s the face-to-face interactions and the real-life case studies and stories that get me excited every year. Why? First off, I love meeting the folks that I've chatted with all year long on various social networking sites, including my 2.0 Adoption Council colleagues, and it’s truly like getting together with a bunch of old friends, sharing stories, drinking beers and just generally talking about whatever’s on our minds.

Speaking of The 2.0 Adoption Council, here’s a fabulous photo of a bunch of us after dinner on Wednesday night, graciously borrowed from our fearless concierge, Susan Scrupski, who was also brave enough to host a workshop with a bunch of us presenting, as well as an entire conference track.  You can check out the presentations from the workshop we gave on SlideShare.

AC1 

 

Secondly, the ability to hear what other companies are doing, what’s working and what’s not, how they’re handling challenges like getting folks to their communities, dealing with critics, increasing engagement, tackling that ever-challenging ROI question, and a multitude of other topics, is priceless. Whether you’re just starting your journey, or well into it like we are at EMC, this conference has something for everyone. A huge kudos to Steve Wylie, Super Woman Paige Finkleman and the whole cast and Advisory Board for another great conference!

Some quick observations around persistent themes:

  • A lot of companies are seeing successful results by enabling their employees to connect and collaborate with one another in easier ways than they have previously been able to do
  • A lot of companies are still trying to figure this out, and are interested in getting started – I met a lot of newbies at the conference, and it’s really great to see that there is still passion and enthusiasm for enabling employees to do their jobs better, faster and smarter
  • There is quickly becoming a large group of us who are hungry for more information than just at the beginner level. We’ve been in this space for 4 years externally and 3 years internally at EMC, and I’m looking to take it to the next level. So are a lot of others.
  • Lots of folks still seeming largely stumped by the ROI question. My answer – it’s a mix of both qualitative and quantitative measures.  Separately, they don’t mean a thing, but together, you can highlight savings, efficiency, and the power of networking and collaboration, so that it’s no longer a question of whether or not it’s providing tangible business results.
  • There is clearly a need for conferences like Enterprise 2.0 to bring together the folks that are trying to make this stuff work in their organizations – both business and IT folks.

As I mentioned before, we’ve been doing this for a long time at EMC, longer than most, in fact, and I’ve been in the thick of it the whole way through.  Here are some things that would take the Enterprise 2.0 conference to the next level for me (I also shared this feedback with the crew at the wrap up Town Hall session on Thursday afternoon):

  • More practitioners and their case studies – I love the knowledge that the high caliber consultants bring to the table, but I also want and frankly need to hear from people sitting in the same seat I am. I think there is a healthy place for both consultants and practitioners, and I just want to ensure we don’t lose sight of that as we move towards the future.
  • I totally get the fact that vendors need to make money, and showcasing their products at a conference like Enterprise 2.0 is one way to do that. That said, I do not want to see vendor demos in the Keynotes portion without a bit of thought leadership thrown in the mix, as well. Tell about your product, but also tell me how it addresses my pain points, and the pain points of my people, my organization. Don’t just walk me through screens and show me clicks. I want to know that you understand me and can help me.
  • I’d like to see differentiation between levels of expertise (or put another way - your place in the journey) for the sessions – nothing to scientific, just a bit of differentiation with case studies at each level of companies considering or that have already implemented some type of offering to their employees:
  • 1.     Beginner – Thinking about Enterprise 2.0 tools, but haven’t implemented? Thinking about how to make the business case? Thinking about how to get started? Thinking about planning for staffing, metrics, community managers, roles and responsibilities, etc? Just implemented within the past 6 months and still getting things moving?

    2.     Intermediate – Implemented more than 6 months ago, but still working to move things forward in your organization? Interested in adoption ideas? Interested in dealing with critics and naysayers? Interested in identifying and tackling under-penetrated pockets within your organization?

    3.     Advanced – Implemented more than a year or two ago? Interested in sustaining the vibrancy, momentum, adoption and engagement in your community?

  • There was mention of including industry information for sessions, and I agree with this – it’s helpful to know what companies in different industries are doing, especially in highly regulated industries.
  • More time for Q&A in all sessions – I can’t tell you how many times a session went on with folks talking, talking, talking, and then someone looked up and “Oops. Looks like we’re out of time for questions.” That’s a real bummer, and frankly, quite a loss. After all, aren’t we there to learn from one another? I know I always have questions at these sessions, but there’s never enough time baked in for audience questions. I’d like to see sessions planned with half the time for the presenters/panel/whatever and half the time reserved for audience questions. And I'd really like to see speakers stick to this format.
  • Finally, I need to see a coming together of the internal E 2.0 worlds and the external social media worlds. As I said in the Town Hall, there are many people like me who have an identity crisis and are tasked with further both internal E 2.0 initiatives, as well as further external social media and community initiatives and awareness. I'd like to see those worlds beginning to come together, and I think we have enough folks focusing on both that it would be a worthwhile endeavor to include a social media track in coming years.  

Overall, a fantastic conference, and by far, one of my favorites every year. In fact, I’d say, even if you can’t afford the full pass – get the free Expo pass and come network with folks at the conference. You won’t be disappointed. I promise.

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Jamie

Blog: www.jamiepappas.com

Twitter: twitter.com/jamiepappas

 

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ComScore: The 2009 U.S. Digital Year in Review "Social Networking Remains One of the Web’s Top Activities in 2009"

ComScore According to comScore's "The 2009 U.S. Digital Year in Review" report nearly four out of five US Internet users visited a social networking site in December 2009. To put that in perspective - nearly 80% of internet users visit social networking sites. Social networking activity now represents 11% of all time spent on the internet in the U.S., making it one of the most popular web activities. In fact, the sub-title of their section on social networking says "Social Networking Remains One of the Web’s Top Activities in 2009." No surprise here.

From a social networking perspective, the report primarily touched on Facebook, Twitter, and MySpace. I'm going to focus my thoughts on Facebook and Twitter, since those are two we focus on at EMC, as MySpace really does not reach our target market.

097124-3d-glossy-blue-orb-icon-social-media-logos-facebook-logo Facebook

Facebook surged to the #1 position among social networks for the first time in May and continued substantial growth throughout 2009, closing out with 112 million visitors in December 2009, up 105% from 2008. 

I was surprised to see that the average number of minutes people spend on Facebook each day is only 23.7 minutes. That seems rather low to me, but comScore attributes that to the increase in frequency of visits, which could make sense. It just seems to me that so many people are on there so often, how could it only be just over 20 minutes per day? What are your thoughts on this number?

Facebook Demographics

Facebook demographics remain relatively split between those over 35 and those under 35, which is also not really surprising to me.

Twitter Twitter

Like Facebook, Twitter's visits also surged in 2009, finishing out 2009 with nearly 20 million visitors, up from just 2 million visitors in 2008.

Twitterdemo

Twitter demographics remains relatively split between those over 35 and those under 35, which is somewhat surprising to me because I would have thought the split would lean higher for those over 35. Twitter experienced the largest increase in people aged 18-24, which is also interesting to me, as I've not really seen this shift. I guess that's just my network experience though! 

Overall

I'm very pleased to see that use of these sites continues to grow, especially since we focus some energy on them at EMC. I'd love to see more information on the quality vs. quantity of posts and users. I'd also love to see some information on participant vs. lurker statistics. I'm always curious to know if the folks out on these sites are actually using them, or just perusing and consuming, but not necessarily creating new content. It changes how you engage with folks when they're lurkers vs. creators. 

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How about you? Anything here surprise you? Anything you weren't surprised by? What do you think this means for the future of social media and social networking sites? My personal opinion - it's great to see the growth continue!


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EMC Enterprise 2.0 Case Study Webinar

Yesterday, I had the pleasure of sharing EMC's Enterprise 2.0 story with a large group of webinar attendees.

I tried to cover the whole gammit of topics from our journey. They include:

  • Tools and Milestones
  • The Business Case
  • Getting Buy-In
  • Dealing with the Critics
  • User Adoption
  • Moderation Process
  • Creating Communities
  • Training and Education
  • Benefits
  • Defining Success
  • EMC's Key Ingredients

Here are the slides from the presentation. I'll post audio as soon as it's available.

EMC Enterprise 2.0 Case Study Webinar for The 2.0 Adoption Council & Newsgator

View more presentations from Jamie Pappas.

Thanks to EMC (of course!) for giving me such a great job that has enabled me to create such a wonderful story to tell! Thanks also to The 2.0 Adoption Council for all of the wonderful opportunities they provide, including being able to participate in webinars such as this one! Thanks to Newsgator for sponsoring The 2.0 Adoption Council webinar series, and providing the opportunity for many of us to share our stories. Finally, thanks to Jive Software for their great product and supporting us along our journey.

Check out the first two webinar presentations, as well!

2.0 Adoption in the Enterprise - The "Before" (Click for audio replay)

Featuring Bruce Galinsky from MetLife, Anu Elmer from Swiss Re, and Greg Lowe from Alcatel-Lucent

2.0 Adoption in the Enterprise - The Before

View more presentations from The 2.0 Adoption Council.

2.0 Adoption in the Enterprise - The "After"  (Click for audio replay)

Featuring Claire Flanagan from CSC, Megan Murray from Booz Allen Hamilton, and Kevin Jones from Dynetics

2.0 Adoption in the Enterprise - The After

View more presentations from The 2.0 Adoption Council.

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Please, share your journey - have you seen some common themes? Some common challenges? Some common success?

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Happy Birthday to My Friend, the Web! #20Years

Happy Birthday! The web is something that many of us take for granted now. We don’t even think twice about popping open a browser page and reading about the latest news, weather, sports, fitness, parenting, or whatever our passion. If you can think of it - chances are good that you can find it on the web. In fact, I’d be curious as to what there might be anymore that you can’t find on the web.

I have always been fascinated by the web. I remember the stars in my eyes the first time I was able to search on something and find information about that topic from people and sources I’d never even heard of before. It was amazing! And for me, it still is.

 ON MagazineThat’s why I found the current issue of ON Magazine to be fascinating! You see, the entire issue is focused on the web and its 20th birthday!  Many of us, in fact, here at EMC have found this issue to be one that resonates deeply with us. Our Blogging Corps has each been taking a turn in sharing our own thoughts on the questions posed by ON Magazine. I was tagged by fellow blogger and EMCer David Spencer, so here are my thoughts…

 

How has the web changed my life?

I can’t even begin to list all of the ways that the web has changed my life. I’m on the web every single day. It’s hard to imagine a day without it, to be honest.  Does that qualify as an addiction?

The first obvious thing that comes to mind is the fact that I have chosen a career focused on the web. Every single day I use the web to communicate with others, both inside and outside of EMC, about what I’m working on. Part of my responsibility is to be on the social web, to understand it, and to teach others how to use it while also developing best practices, use cases, and guidelines for participation that help people to understand how to use it to represent EMC well.

Stargate SG-1 The second thing that comes to mind is the ease with which I can access information. As a Stargate SG-1 fan, I like Chris Brogan’s analogy of “gate jumping” in this issue. The web allows me to jump around and view what I’m interested in, for as long as I’m interested in it and then move along and check out the next thing. As I said before – you can search on and find information on just about anything you can possibly think of. I don’t have phone books in my house any longer because I look everything up on the web. I watch news, TV shows, and movies on the web. I have even sold some (not all because some books I still love to hold in my hands while reading them) of my books that are available on the web. Every one of my research papers for my MBA had more web resources sited that physical books and periodicals. I even turned in my papers for my degree online.

I’m trying to find a facet of my life that the web doesn’t touch these days…We planned our wedding in Maui online down to the very last item. We shopped for our condo online, researched neighborhoods and communities online, even applied for our mortgage online – I never even met our mortgage broker in person. I shopped for my car online, and car insurance and a local dealer near where I lived for service. I print grocery coupons from online, and view the weekly sales ads online. I subscribe to newsletters that I’m interested in online and receive them via email. I share photos, videos and updates with colleagues and our family online. If I’m presenting at an event, my family can often view it online as though they were there. I even design and order our holiday cards online.

How has the web changed business and society?

In addition to all of the above examples of information accessibility which have certainly impacted business and society in general, there are businesses around now that are strictly online. They don’t even have a physical office that people go in to every day – business is conducted remotely via email, web meetings, phone calls, and even telepresence. Tools like Skype allow me to view and chat with anyone in the world with an internet connection and an account for free, which is still an amazing concept to me.

The web, and particularly the social web, has enabled businesses to connect with companies and individuals like never before. The possibilities for sharing and gathering information are immeasurable. Listening in the social web enables us to be that “fly on the wall” we’ve all wished we could be at one time or another when looking for feedback on our companies and products. The social web enables us to send messages far and wide for very little investment (generally only someone’s time) in such a viral nature that we’ve still not fully harnessed how far our reach is with such social platforms.

Worldmap The web has connected the world and made it much flatter and enabled worldwide collaboration in ways that we might never have imagined 20 years ago. I can talk to anyone, anywhere, at any time, many of whom I’d have never had an opportunity to meet, had it not been for the web.  

What do I think the web will look like in twenty years?

It’s hard to say for sure…but I think buzz words like social media, Web 2.0, Web 3.0, social web will be long gone. There will be no need to define it that way because it will already be that way, and will have been for a long time…

Kids coming of age now have already always had the web all of their lives. They think it’s the norm. Imagine how it will be in another 20 years – the children coming of age in 20 years will have always had the social web and conversations and interactions that are still new to many.

I think too that the notion of websites will likely go away – content will be served up more based on individual user preferences. It will be like an uber personal landing page experience or something like that.

The web as we know it today will likely be unrecognizable in twenty years, it will have evolved and changed so much. But, imagine the possibilities….Just too cool! I can’t wait!

I've tagged Christine Christopherson to carry on the topic.

So, what about you - What do you think the web will look like in twenty years?

 

Check out the other blogs on this topic:

Barry Burke - #20years of the web, as seen by the storage anarchist

Christine Christopherson - The Web at 20…looking good, kid!

David Spencer - The web at #20years old

Edward Newman - The Web at 20!

Gina Minks - The web has been around for #20years (and I’ve been around for 14 of them)

Kathrin Winkler - The Web and the World

Len Devanna - Celebrating 20 Years of Web

Natalie Corridan-Gregg - Internet is 20 years old. Ah, to be twenty years old again!

Stuart Miniman - Imagine the Web in 20 Years & Celebrating the Web at 20

Yo Delmar - The Web is 20 years old, what now in the next 20?



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Engage. Evangelize. Empower. The 2.0 Adoption Council is waiting for you!

The 2.0 Adoption Council  You might have heard about the 2.0 Adoption Council from any one of our nearly 100 members who’ve joined thus far, or you might have noticed the logo right here on the left rail of my blog. I’ve had the pleasure of being among the very first group of internal 2.0 evangelists to come together and help one another by sharing ideas, tips, tricks and best practices for what it is we do every single day – evangelize the benefits of Enterprise 2.0 and enterprise collaboration and networking technologies (think communities, wikis, blogs, discussion forums, microblogging, etc.) and share with our enterprise organizations the benefits of exploring these tools and technologies to connect employees, change and improve business processes, and open up information that’s critical to the organization’s long-term success.

Member Benefits  What are the benefits of membership?

All of our members are all involved directly in developing and executing strategy for their organizations.  This means that we get to directly converse and collaborate with people doing exactly what we’re doing. I cannot stress enough the power of being able to discuss, share and ask questions of people focused on the same things that I am working on day in and day out.

As Andrew McAfee said at Enterprise 2.0 in San Francisco back in November, being an evangelist can be a lonely job because you’re often the only person or one of only a few who are in the role of an evangelist and you’re often in a situation where you’re sharing ideas, best practices, and benefits with folks who are not quite there yet in terms of seeing Enterprise 2.0 as a critical component of the future success of the organization. Having a network of peers to talk with and bounce ideas off of is just immensely helpful and refreshing.

We are a well-recognized group of thought leaders. Even in our short time since creation by Enterprise 2.0 expert Susan Scrupski (aka ITSinsider), we have received quite a bit of positive industry recognition by folks such as Andrew McAfee, Dion Hinchcliffe, Gil Yehuda, Dan Keldsen and Carl Frappaolo of Information Architected, and many others. We were also a research partner for the Enterprise 2.0 Conference in San Francisco and members have been interviewed by publications such as BusinessWeek, CIOZone, IDC, and The Economist.

We have access to and demonstrations from a wide variety of vendors and experts in the Enterprise 2.0 space. We’re often the first to know, or among the first to know about new products and services being offered, and are often offered access to the products to test them out and see what we think. We also schedule regular calls and discussions with industry experts in the Enterprise 2.0 space to ask them our toughest questions and learn from them first-hand. I can’t say that I’ve ever had the opportunity to chat with so many experts and learn from so many folks that have gone before me, before now.

We publish ground-breaking industry research. We are committed to collaborating on and publishing research from the Council members’ knowledge and experiences. You can check out our latest report on our site, and order a copy of it if interested. I highly recommend it!

So, are you interested yet?

2.0 Adoption Council Member Testimonials  If all of this hasn’t been enough to encourage you to join us, check out our member testimonials:

I’m proud to be a member of The 2.0 Adoption Council because it provides me with an opportunity to connect with and have meaningful conversation with peers from all over the world facing the same challenges that I am on a daily basis. I’m able to tap into the Council at a moment’s notice, and ask for opinions, experience and assistance with a wide variety of topics and receive practical advice from my peers. I’m also able to share my own experiences in the hopes that they’ll help others along their own journey. I’m honored to be a part of the Council and the experience it provides.

Jamie Pappas, Manager, Social Media Strategy, EMC Corporation

 

Membership in The 2.0 Adoption Council is a must for any professional responsible for internal social computing. The ability to connect with smart people across the industry has been invaluable to me.

Laurie Buczek, Social Computing Program Manager, Intel Corporation

 

In just a few short weeks my network of colleagues and experts who share the same passion and focus that I do in the Enterprise 2.0 space has expanded exponentially. For the first time I no longer feel isolated behind our firewall wondering how others are dealing with the challenges I might have. In just a few weeks, I have already been able to benchmark best practices and case studies with a few members, an activity which has directly benefited me in the next stage in our internal deployment. I find the members all wanting to help and engage, making it a great source for real exchange and support.

Claire Flanagan, Sr. Manager, KM and Enterprise Social Software Strategy, CSC Corporation

 

Being a member of The 2.0 Adoption Council immediately paid off by expanding my network of knowledgeable and experienced internal community/social media professionals. Now I have that many more people to collaborate with regarding decisions and questions we’re faced with daily.

Matthew Ladin, Corporate Social Networking Chief Evangelist/Technical Lead, Texas Instruments

 

It’s only been 3 weeks but if first impressions are any indication, this is going to be a very valuable group for me. I think the opportunity for regular, informal contact through social cast and then the yammer platform is a great way to bring us together. I’ve enjoyed the discussion throughout the day and the opportunities available to learn from each other as we navigate these new waters. I look forward to expanding my participation and expanding the relationships that are budding….Thanks!

Jim Worth, Director MRL II, Merck Research Labs

 

I go to conferences, I Twitter, I Yammer, I’ve got friends and colleagues in Facebook, Ning and LinkedIn, but I didn’t have a virtual community of like-minded, focused and creative people looking to drive the 2.0 mantra throughout their organization, be it through culture, education, collaboration, technology or leadership. The 2.0 Adoption Council has become that place for me and the intellectual competence and idea exchange is second to none.

Dan Pontefract, Senior Director, Learning & Collaboration, TELUS

 

I am proud to be part of The 2.0 Adoption Council because of the network of knowledgeable peers in this space. We are all engaged with helping to make E20 successful in our organizations which bonds us. Our work in enhancing adoption is new territory and it’s exciting to be in the midst of this thinking, learning, strategizing and sharing of experiences.

Mary Maida, Information Solutions Manager, Medtronic, Inc.


The 2.0 Adoption Council has been a godsend for me. When I first opted in I was giddy at the idea of having others commiserate with and bounce ideas off of. It quickly became very clear that we had more answers than I’ve ever heard from a stage or an online event. It taps right into the strength of conference events; we get to have the hallway discussion every day if we like. We can drill down and talk about the realities of challenges, change, tools, and how to navigate these uncharted waters.

Megan Murray, Community Manager, Project Coordinator, Booz Allen Hamilton

 

Being a member of The 2.0 Adoption Council has given me a peer organization to share my challenges and my successes. I always find someone who is willing to help me out when I hit an issue that I have not dealt with before. The advice and expertise I receive is an invaluable resource for implementing collaborative solutions within my company. The team spirit and camaraderie of the council is well represented in everything we do from Demo Thursdays, to Guru Q&A, to exploring and evaluating new tools. I can’t thank my fellow members enough for the value that I take away each and every day.

Greg Lowe, Social Media Architect/Program Manager, Alcatel-Lucent

So, what are you waiting for? Join us


The Power of Saying Thank You

Thank you It seems fitting that during Thanksgiving week, I should write about the power of saying “thank you” in addition to the fact that it’s been something on my mind for a while. It seems in this busy world, we often forget to take time out and thank the people that mean the most to us, that we appreciate, and that help us to keep on keepin’ on, both personally and professionally. Social media actually provides us a perfect avenue and opportunity to do just that.

 

Are you listening?

We should all know by now the importance of listening in the social world, especially when using social media for brand management (personal or business brand) and business. I talk about the importance of listening just about every time I talk about social media and how much we can learn from just sitting back and listening to conversations all around us. But one thing I’ve noticed is that it seems when listening in the social world, we often tend to hone in on the negative side of things and forget to also embrace the positive. The knee-jerk reaction is to pick up on the negative comments and react to those. One might even call it “doing damage control,” especially if it’s an influential person or entity sharing negative sentiment. The problem with only focusing on the negative is that’s only half-listening. And if that’s all you’re doing, you’re missing a huge opportunity.

 

There is an immense amount of learning to be accomplished in also taking note of the positive commentary on any given topic. After all, if you want to know what people hate, why wouldn’t you also want to know what people love about the product or brand? Doesn’t knowing the pros as well as the cons paint the full picture for you? I guess I don’t need to say that my answer here is – YES!

 

Just as we tend to reach out to help fix the negative commentary and hopefully build good will for the brand by addressing and fixing things within our scope of influence, I’d offer that taking a moment and thanking those individuals or entities sharing positive feedback with us also builds good will for the brand. And not only that, it just makes you feel good to note the positive side of things for a change!


Thank You Mugs So, in the spirit of Thanksgiving, do me a favor and be sure to thank someone for saying something nice about you, your brand or your company this week! And if you need to know how to say thank you in multiple languages, here are over 465 ways to do so!


And thanks to you for reading my blog!

 

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 Jamie 

 Blog: http://www.jamiepappas.com

 Twitter: http://twitter.com/jamiepappas